An evaluation of three self-report physical activity instruments for older adults. Harada, N., D., Chiu, V., King, A., C., & Stewart, A., L. Medicine and science in sports and exercise, 33(6):962-70, 6, 2001.
An evaluation of three self-report physical activity instruments for older adults. [pdf]Paper  An evaluation of three self-report physical activity instruments for older adults. [link]Website  abstract   bibtex   
PURPOSE: To assess the known-groups and construct validity of measures from the CHAMPS Physical Activity Questionnaire, Physical Activity Survey for the Elderly (PASE), and the Yale Physical Activity Survey (YPAS). METHODS: The three questionnaires were administered to a convenience sample of older adults (N = 87) recruited from community centers and retirement homes. Validation measures included the SF-36 measures of physical functioning, general health, mental health, and pain; body mass index; performance-based tests of lower body functioning and endurance; and Mini-Logger activity monitor data from ankle and waist sensors. Validity was estimated by testing hypotheses about associations between physical activity and validation measures. RESULTS: As hypothesized, differences in activity levels on all measures were found between older adults in retirement homes (less active) and community centers (more active) (P-values < 0.0001). Correlations of physical activity measures with performance-based measures ranged from 0.44 to 0.68, conforming to hypotheses; hypotheses regarding associations with the SF-36 measures were also confirmed. Body mass index was not correlated with any of the physical activity measures, contrary to hypotheses. Correlations of physical activity measures with Mini-Logger counts ranged from 0.36 to 0.59 (ankle) and 0.42 to 0.61 (waist) as hypothesized. Correlations among the measures from the three instruments ranged from 0.58 to 0.68. CONCLUSIONS: The PASE, YPAS, and CHAMPS each demonstrated acceptable validity, as all measures met nearly all hypotheses. Higher validity coefficients were found for subgroups (men, 65-74 yr, retirement home), suggesting that these instruments may perform better for certain segments of the older adult population.
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 year = {2001},
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 keywords = {80 and over,Activities of Daily Living,Aged,Aging,Energy Metabolism,Exercise,Female,Health Status,Humans,Male,Mental Health,Questionnaires,Reproducibility of Results,Sensitivity and Specificity},
 pages = {962-70},
 volume = {33},
 websites = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11404662},
 month = {6},
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 abstract = {PURPOSE: To assess the known-groups and construct validity of measures from the CHAMPS Physical Activity Questionnaire, Physical Activity Survey for the Elderly (PASE), and the Yale Physical Activity Survey (YPAS). METHODS: The three questionnaires were administered to a convenience sample of older adults (N = 87) recruited from community centers and retirement homes. Validation measures included the SF-36 measures of physical functioning, general health, mental health, and pain; body mass index; performance-based tests of lower body functioning and endurance; and Mini-Logger activity monitor data from ankle and waist sensors. Validity was estimated by testing hypotheses about associations between physical activity and validation measures. RESULTS: As hypothesized, differences in activity levels on all measures were found between older adults in retirement homes (less active) and community centers (more active) (P-values < 0.0001). Correlations of physical activity measures with performance-based measures ranged from 0.44 to 0.68, conforming to hypotheses; hypotheses regarding associations with the SF-36 measures were also confirmed. Body mass index was not correlated with any of the physical activity measures, contrary to hypotheses. Correlations of physical activity measures with Mini-Logger counts ranged from 0.36 to 0.59 (ankle) and 0.42 to 0.61 (waist) as hypothesized. Correlations among the measures from the three instruments ranged from 0.58 to 0.68. CONCLUSIONS: The PASE, YPAS, and CHAMPS each demonstrated acceptable validity, as all measures met nearly all hypotheses. Higher validity coefficients were found for subgroups (men, 65-74 yr, retirement home), suggesting that these instruments may perform better for certain segments of the older adult population.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Harada, Nancy D and Chiu, Vicki and King, Abby C and Stewart, Anita L},
 journal = {Medicine and science in sports and exercise},
 number = {6}
}
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