Prototyping D&D Tasks Using a Dual-arm Robotic System. Harden, T., Pryor, M., Rajan, R., Yoo, J., Kapoor, C., & Tesar, D. In Proceeding of the ANS Topical Meeting on Robotics and Automation, pages 1–11, Seattle, WA, March, 2001. ANS.
abstract   bibtex   
The University of Texas at Austin is conducting research in the development and application of robotic systems for various Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) tasks. This research includes the development of modular robotic hardware that scales from simple 1-2 Degree Of Freedom (DOF) systems to complex dual-arm systems. Research is also being pursued in the development of the required control software for such systems with an emphasis on generality, the man-machine interface, obstacle avoidance, and decision-making for enhanced performance. This paper describes prototyping a D&D type task with operational software (called OSCAR), a dual-arm robotic system (a 17 DOF system from Robotics Research Corp.), and tooling based on D&D application requirements. A material size reduction task is chosen for this prototype application. This task involves the use of one arm of the dual-arm robot to hold and position the work piece while the other arm uses off-the-shelf tooling (a cutting saw appropriately modified for computer control and commercially available tool changers) to cut the work piece. Necessary hardware developments for the demonstration included the integration of tool changers, crash protection devices, force/torque sensors, and the associated electronic instrumentation and wiring. OSCAR software modules were used to build the low-level control software that included redundant kinematics, robot servo-control interfacing, and the man-machine interface. Additional software was developed for path planning and application programming. A 3D-graphical model was developed for system design and off-line programming and verification. The system is implemented using off-the-shelf components including PC hardware, the Windows NT operating system, and commercial data acquisition hardware, tool changers, and crash protection devices. The demonstration discussed in this paper accomplishes the goal of performing a relatively complex and useful dual-arm task while reducing development time and hardware costs. Aspects of integrating off-the-shelf components and modular software are presented. Future work and enhancements are also discussed including improved task planning, programming features, force control, motion planning, tool integration, an improved man-machine interface, and the seamless integration of obstacle avoidance.
@inproceedings{harden_prototyping_2001,
	address = {Seattle, WA},
	title = {Prototyping {D}\&{D} {Tasks} {Using} a {Dual}-arm {Robotic} {System}},
	abstract = {The University of Texas at Austin is conducting research in the development and application of robotic systems for various Deactivation and Decommissioning (D\&D) tasks. This research includes the development of modular robotic hardware that scales from simple 1-2 Degree Of Freedom (DOF) systems to complex dual-arm systems. Research is also being pursued in the development of the required control software for such systems with an  emphasis on generality, the man-machine interface, obstacle avoidance, and decision-making for enhanced performance. This paper describes prototyping a D\&D type task with operational software (called OSCAR), a dual-arm robotic system (a 17 DOF system from Robotics Research Corp.), and tooling based on D\&D application requirements.
A material size reduction task is chosen for this prototype application. This task involves the use of one arm of the dual-arm robot to hold and position the work piece while the other arm uses off-the-shelf tooling (a cutting saw appropriately modified for computer control and commercially available tool changers) to cut the work piece. Necessary hardware developments for the demonstration included the integration of tool changers, crash protection devices, force/torque sensors, and the associated electronic instrumentation and wiring. OSCAR software modules were used to build the low-level control software that included redundant kinematics, robot servo-control interfacing, and the man-machine interface. Additional software was developed for path planning and application programming. A 3D-graphical model was developed
for system design and off-line programming and verification. The system is implemented using off-the-shelf components including PC hardware, the Windows NT operating system, and commercial data acquisition hardware, tool changers, and crash protection devices. The demonstration discussed in this paper accomplishes the goal of performing a relatively complex and useful dual-arm task while reducing development time and hardware costs. Aspects of integrating off-the-shelf components and modular software are presented. Future work and enhancements are also discussed including improved task planning, programming features, force control, motion planning, tool  integration, an improved man-machine interface, and the seamless integration of obstacle avoidance.},
	booktitle = {Proceeding of the {ANS} {Topical} {Meeting} on {Robotics} and {Automation}},
	publisher = {ANS},
	author = {Harden, Troy and Pryor, Mitchell and Rajan, Ratheesh and Yoo, Jae and Kapoor, Chetan and Tesar, Delbert},
	month = mar,
	year = {2001},
	pages = {1--11},
}
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