XJ: Facilitating XML Processing in Java. Harren, M., Raghavachari, M., Shmueli, O., Burke, M. G., Bordawekar, R., Pechtchanski, I., & Sarkar, V. In pages 278-287.
abstract   bibtex   
The increased importance of XML as a data representation format has led to several proposals for facilitating the development of applications that operate on XML data. These proposals range from runtime API-based interfaces to XML-based programming languages. The subject of this paper is XJ, a research language that proposes novel mechanisms for the integration of XML as a first-class construct into Java. The design goals of XJ distinguish it from past work on integrating XML support into programming languages --- specifically, the XJ design adheres to the XML Schema and XPath standards. Moreover, it supports in-place updates of XML data thereby keeping with the imperative nature of Java. We have built a prototype compiler for XJ, and our preliminary experiments demonstrate that the performance of XJ programs can approach that of traditional low-level API-based interfaces, while providing a higher level of abstraction.
@inproceedings{ har05,
  crossref = {www2005},
  author = {Matthew Harren and Mukund Raghavachari and Oded Shmueli and Michael G. Burke and Rajesh Bordawekar and Igor Pechtchanski and Vivek Sarkar},
  title = {XJ: Facilitating XML Processing in Java},
  pages = {278-287},
  topic = {xj[0.9]},
  uri = {http://www2005.org/cdrom/docs/p278.pdf},
  abstract = {The increased importance of XML as a data representation format has led to several proposals for facilitating the development of applications that operate on XML data. These proposals range from runtime API-based interfaces to XML-based programming languages. The subject of this paper is XJ, a research language that proposes novel mechanisms for the integration of XML as a first-class construct into Java. The design goals of XJ distinguish it from past work on integrating XML support into programming languages --- specifically, the XJ design adheres to the XML Schema and XPath standards. Moreover, it supports in-place updates of XML data thereby keeping with the imperative nature of Java. We have built a prototype compiler for XJ, and our preliminary experiments demonstrate that the performance of XJ programs can approach that of traditional low-level API-based interfaces, while providing a higher level of abstraction.}
}
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