Observing, Collecting and Governing “Ourselves” and “Others”: Mass-Observation's Fieldwork Agencements. Harrison, R. History and Anthropology, 25(2):227–245, March, 2014. ZSCC: 0000013
Observing, Collecting and Governing “Ourselves” and “Others”: Mass-Observation's Fieldwork Agencements [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
This paper explores the relationship between oligoptic visual economies and liberal technologies of government which emerge from a consideration of the field collecting practices of Mass-Observation (MO), a social research movement established in the years leading up to the outbreak of the Second World War which attempted to develop an anthropology of British “everyday” life. Focussing on MO's fieldwork agencements, the paper shows how the project brought together museological methods of collecting and curating with new mechanisms of collective self-watching, and the ways in which these mechanisms became implicated in technologies of government through its archival operations. In the connections it drew between the liberal subjectivities of collective self-watching and surrealist aesthetic practices, MO played a significant role in shaping new governmental rationalities, with implications for both metropolitan and colonial populations, through its interlinked conceptions of “mass” and “morale”. These formed part of a broader scientific–administrative–bureaucratic apparatus which facilitated the classification, ordering and governance of populations and “things” in this and later periods.
@article{harrison_observing_2014,
	title = {Observing, {Collecting} and {Governing} “{Ourselves}” and “{Others}”: {Mass}-{Observation}'s {Fieldwork} {Agencements}},
	volume = {25},
	issn = {0275-7206},
	shorttitle = {Observing, {Collecting} and {Governing} “{Ourselves}” and “{Others}”},
	url = {https://doi.org/10.1080/02757206.2014.882835},
	doi = {10.1080/02757206.2014.882835},
	abstract = {This paper explores the relationship between oligoptic visual economies and liberal technologies of government which emerge from a consideration of the field collecting practices of Mass-Observation (MO), a social research movement established in the years leading up to the outbreak of the Second World War which attempted to develop an anthropology of British “everyday” life. Focussing on MO's fieldwork agencements, the paper shows how the project brought together museological methods of collecting and curating with new mechanisms of collective self-watching, and the ways in which these mechanisms became implicated in technologies of government through its archival operations. In the connections it drew between the liberal subjectivities of collective self-watching and surrealist aesthetic practices, MO played a significant role in shaping new governmental rationalities, with implications for both metropolitan and colonial populations, through its interlinked conceptions of “mass” and “morale”. These formed part of a broader scientific–administrative–bureaucratic apparatus which facilitated the classification, ordering and governance of populations and “things” in this and later periods.},
	number = {2},
	urldate = {2019-02-18},
	journal = {History and Anthropology},
	author = {Harrison, Rodney},
	month = mar,
	year = {2014},
	note = {ZSCC: 0000013},
	keywords = {more than 5 citations, read, table of contents},
	pages = {227--245}
}

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