Benefits and Limitations of the Ecosystem Services Concept in Environmental Policy and Decision Making: Some Stakeholder Perspectives. Hauck, J., Görg, C., Varjopuro, R., Ratamäki, O., & Jax, K. 25:13–21.
Benefits and Limitations of the Ecosystem Services Concept in Environmental Policy and Decision Making: Some Stakeholder Perspectives [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
[Abstract] The concept of ecosystem services (ES) is increasingly being used in environmental policy and decision making. We report here on the empirical results which emerged from stakeholder discussions within the PRESS (PEER Research on EcoSystem Services) project on certain unresolved challenges related to the use of the ES concept in decision making. The results show that the occurrence of synergies and trade-offs between different ES and their relevance for decision making depends significantly on the scale involved (in particular regarding the levels of policy formulation and policy implementation respectively) and on the specific ways in which ecosystems are managed (e.g. different practices in forestry and agriculture). We conclude that using the concept of ecosystem services, would enable a comprehensive evaluation of policy impacts. Such an evaluation would contribute to an increased congruence between policies by uncovering and discussing trade-offs and realize synergies. Crucial to this, however, is a sound assessment that incorporates the diversity of stakeholder perceptions, knowledge and preferences at the different scales. [Highlights] [::] Many ES - apart from non-marketable services - are implicitly addressed in many European policies. [::] A wide diversity of explanations exists for why people choose one ES over another. [::] Trade-offs and synergies between ES depend on management. [::] The significance of trade-offs and synergies depends on the scale of decision making.
@article{hauckBenefitsLimitationsEcosystem2013,
  title = {Benefits and Limitations of the Ecosystem Services Concept in Environmental Policy and Decision Making: Some Stakeholder Perspectives},
  author = {Hauck, Jennifer and Görg, Christoph and Varjopuro, Riku and Ratamäki, Outi and Jax, Kurt},
  date = {2013-01},
  journaltitle = {Environmental Science \& Policy},
  volume = {25},
  pages = {13--21},
  issn = {1462-9011},
  doi = {10.1016/j.envsci.2012.08.001},
  url = {https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envsci.2012.08.001},
  abstract = {[Abstract]

The concept of ecosystem services (ES) is increasingly being used in environmental policy and decision making. We report here on the empirical results which emerged from stakeholder discussions within the PRESS (PEER Research on EcoSystem Services) project on certain unresolved challenges related to the use of the ES concept in decision making. The results show that the occurrence of synergies and trade-offs between different ES and their relevance for decision making depends significantly on the scale involved (in particular regarding the levels of policy formulation and policy implementation respectively) and on the specific ways in which ecosystems are managed (e.g. different practices in forestry and agriculture). We conclude that using the concept of ecosystem services, would enable a comprehensive evaluation of policy impacts. Such an evaluation would contribute to an increased congruence between policies by uncovering and discussing trade-offs and realize synergies. Crucial to this, however, is a sound assessment that incorporates the diversity of stakeholder perceptions, knowledge and preferences at the different scales.

[Highlights]

[::] Many ES - apart from non-marketable services - are implicitly addressed in many European policies. [::] A wide diversity of explanations exists for why people choose one ES over another. [::] Trade-offs and synergies between ES depend on management. [::] The significance of trade-offs and synergies depends on the scale of decision making.},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-11657525,~to-add-doi-URL,agricultural-resources,ecosystem-services,environmental-policy,forest-resources,multi-stakeholder-decision-making,science-based-decision-making,uncertainty}
}
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