Application of a Distributed Large Basin Runoff Model in the Great Lakes Basin. He, C. & Croley, T. E. 15(8):1001–1011.
Application of a Distributed Large Basin Runoff Model in the Great Lakes Basin [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
This paper analyzes the application of a spatially distributed large basin runoff model (DLBRM) in the Great Lakes Basin of the United Stats and Canada and discusses four essential components of operational hydrologic model development: model structure, model input, model calibration, and Geographical Information System (GIS)-model interface. The results indicate that large scale operational hydrologic models that are based on mass continuity equations and include land surface, soil zones, and groundwater components require fewer parameters, are less data demanding, and are particularly suitable for solving water resources problems over large spatial and temporal scales than many other models. Use of GIS-model interfaces is essential for utilizing the existing multiple digital databases in defining model input and in facilitating model implementation and applicability.
@article{heApplicationDistributedLarge2007,
  title = {Application of a Distributed Large Basin Runoff Model in the {{Great Lakes}} Basin},
  author = {He, Chansheng and Croley, Thomas E.},
  date = {2007-08},
  journaltitle = {Control Engineering Practice},
  volume = {15},
  pages = {1001--1011},
  issn = {0967-0661},
  doi = {10.1016/j.conengprac.2007.01.011},
  url = {https://doi.org/10.1016/j.conengprac.2007.01.011},
  abstract = {This paper analyzes the application of a spatially distributed large basin runoff model (DLBRM) in the Great Lakes Basin of the United Stats and Canada and discusses four essential components of operational hydrologic model development: model structure, model input, model calibration, and Geographical Information System (GIS)-model interface. The results indicate that large scale operational hydrologic models that are based on mass continuity equations and include land surface, soil zones, and groundwater components require fewer parameters, are less data demanding, and are particularly suitable for solving water resources problems over large spatial and temporal scales than many other models. Use of GIS-model interfaces is essential for utilizing the existing multiple digital databases in defining model input and in facilitating model implementation and applicability.},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-11325839,gis,modelling,runoff,water-resources},
  number = {8}
}
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