Phenology of the blackcurrant leaf midge (Dasineura tetensi) in northern Sweden. Hellqvist, S. Acta Agriculturae Scandinavica, Section B-Plant Soil Science, 51(2):84–90, 2001.
Phenology of the blackcurrant leaf midge (Dasineura tetensi) in northern Sweden [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
he phenology of the black currant leaf midge Dasineura tetensi was studied for 4 years in Umea § in the north of Sweden. At least two generations per annum were recorded. Oviposition by the first generation started at the beginning of June, a few days before the beginning of the flowering period of black currant. Measured as accumulated day-degrees, it started at 44-69 day-degrees, using air temperatures, a threshold temperature of 7°;C and the first date when the surface of the soil was free from snow as the starting date for day-degree accumulation. A forecasting model, using air temperatures and a logistic function based on developmental rates of a Norwegian population, predicted the time of oviposition with fairly good accuracy. The temperature requirements for the development of the studied Swedish population appeared to be lower than those reported for an English population of D. tetensi. Oviposition by the second generation started at approximately 250-300 day-degrees.
@article{hellqvist_phenology_2001,
	title = {Phenology of the blackcurrant leaf midge ({Dasineura} tetensi) in northern {Sweden}},
	volume = {51},
	issn = {0906-4710},
	url = {http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/090647101753483804},
	abstract = {he phenology of the black currant leaf midge Dasineura tetensi was studied for 4 years in Umea § in the north of Sweden. At least two generations per annum were recorded. Oviposition by the first generation started at the beginning of June, a few days before the beginning of the flowering period of black currant. Measured as accumulated day-degrees, it started at 44-69 day-degrees, using air temperatures, a threshold temperature of 7°;C and the first date when the surface of the soil was free from snow as the starting date for day-degree accumulation. A forecasting model, using air temperatures and a logistic function based on developmental rates of a Norwegian population, predicted the time of oviposition with fairly good accuracy. The temperature requirements for the development of the studied Swedish population appeared to be lower than those reported for an English population of D. tetensi. Oviposition by the second generation started at approximately 250-300 day-degrees.},
	number = {2},
	journal = {Acta Agriculturae Scandinavica, Section B-Plant Soil Science},
	author = {Hellqvist, Sven},
	year = {2001},
	pages = {84--90}
}
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