The Unofficial Guide for Authors (or How to Produce Research Articles Worth Citing). Hengl, T. & Gould, M. Office for Official Publications of the European Communities.
The Unofficial Guide for Authors (or How to Produce Research Articles Worth Citing) [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
Most scientific journals provide guidelines for authors – how to format references and prepare artwork, how many copies of the paper to submit and to which address. However, behind any formal editorial system are real people with their professional and personal interests, which often have a profound influence on the chances that your paper will get accepted (or rejected). The official guidelines say little about how you should prepare your paper and what are the chances that it will be accepted. You will not be able to find such information on journal websites. This gave us the idea to write an unofficial guide for authors, in which we could tell you frankly what you can expect from journals, editors, reviewers and, indeed, the whole system of science. We offer some pragmatic tips on how to manage the production of your paper – based on a training programme in academic writing and our own experience. We also address some of the deeper aspects of preparing and publishing research articles as well as the limitations and frustrations that are inherent in current editorial systems such as hyperproduction, phoney co-authors and poor reviews. This guide is primarily intended for inexperienced researchers, although we hope more experienced authors will also find some of the points raised in it of interest.
@book{henglUnofficialGuideAuthors2006,
  title = {The Unofficial Guide for Authors (or How to Produce Research Articles Worth Citing)},
  author = {Hengl, Tomislav and Gould, Mike},
  date = {2006},
  publisher = {{Office for Official Publications of the European Communities}},
  location = {{Luxembourg}},
  url = {http://mfkp.org/INRMM/article/14679851},
  abstract = {Most scientific journals provide guidelines for authors – how to format references and prepare artwork, how many copies of the paper to submit and to which address. However, behind any formal editorial system are real people with their professional and personal interests, which often have a profound influence on the chances that your paper will get accepted (or rejected). The official guidelines say little about how you should prepare your paper and what are the chances that it will be accepted. You will not be able to find such information on journal websites. This gave us the idea to write an unofficial guide for authors, in which we could tell you frankly what you can expect from journals, editors, reviewers and, indeed, the whole system of science. We offer some pragmatic tips on how to manage the production of your paper -- based on a training programme in academic writing and our own experience. We also address some of the deeper aspects of preparing and publishing research articles as well as the limitations and frustrations that are inherent in current editorial systems such as hyperproduction, phoney co-authors and poor reviews. This guide is primarily intended for inexperienced researchers, although we hope more experienced authors will also find some of the points raised in it of interest.},
  isbn = {92-79-01703-9},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-14679851,check-list,guidelines,publication-bias,publish-or-perish,scientific-communication}
}
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