Behavior of a recombinant baculovirus in lepidopteran hosts with different susceptibilities. Hernandez-Crespo, P., Sait, S., M., Hails, R., S., & Cory, J., S. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 67(3):1140-1146, 2001.
abstract   bibtex   
Insect pathogens, such as baculoviruses, that are used as microbial insecticides have been genetically modified to increase their speed of action. Nontarget species will often be exposed to these pathogens, and it is important to know the consequences of infection in hosts across the whole spectrum of susceptibility. Two key parameters, speed of kill and pathogen yield, are compared here for two baculoviruses, a wild-type Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcNPV), AcNPV clone C6, and a genetically modified AcNPV which expresses an insect-selective toxin, AcNPV-ST3, for two lepidopteran hosts which differ in susceptibility, The pathogenicity of the two viruses was equal in the less-susceptible host, Mamestra brassicae, but the recombinant was more pathogenic than the wild-type virus in the susceptible species, Trichoplusia ni. Both viruses took longer to kill the larvae of M. brassicae than to kill those of T. ni. However, whereas the larvae of T. ni mere killed more quickly by the recombinant virus, the reverse mas found to be true for the larvae of M. brassicae. Both viruses produced a greater yield in M. brassicae, and the yield of the recombinant was significantly lower than that of the wild type in both species. The virus yield increased linearly with the time taken for the insects to die. However despite the more rapid speed of kill of the wild-type AcNPV in M. brassicae, the yield was significantly lower for the recombinant virus at any given time to death. A lower yield for the recombinant virus could be the result of a reduction in replication rate. This was investigated by comparing determinations of the virus yield per unit of weight of insect cadaver. The response of the two species (to both viruses) was very different: the yield per unit of weight decreased over time for M. brassicae but increased for T. ni, The implications of these data for risk assessment of wild-type and genetically modified baculoviruses are discussed.
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 title = {Behavior of a recombinant baculovirus in lepidopteran hosts with different susceptibilities},
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 year = {2001},
 pages = {1140-1146},
 volume = {67},
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 abstract = {Insect pathogens, such as baculoviruses, that are used as microbial insecticides have been genetically modified to increase their speed of action. Nontarget species will often be exposed to these pathogens, and it is important to know the consequences of infection in hosts across the whole spectrum of susceptibility. Two key parameters, speed of kill and pathogen yield, are compared here for two baculoviruses, a wild-type Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcNPV), AcNPV clone C6, and a genetically modified AcNPV which expresses an insect-selective toxin, AcNPV-ST3, for two lepidopteran hosts which differ in susceptibility, The pathogenicity of the two viruses was equal in the less-susceptible host, Mamestra brassicae, but the recombinant was more pathogenic than the wild-type virus in the susceptible species, Trichoplusia ni. Both viruses took longer to kill the larvae of M. brassicae than to kill those of T. ni. However, whereas the larvae of T. ni mere killed more quickly by the recombinant virus, the reverse mas found to be true for the larvae of M. brassicae. Both viruses produced a greater yield in M. brassicae, and the yield of the recombinant was significantly lower than that of the wild type in both species. The virus yield increased linearly with the time taken for the insects to die. However despite the more rapid speed of kill of the wild-type AcNPV in M. brassicae, the yield was significantly lower for the recombinant virus at any given time to death. A lower yield for the recombinant virus could be the result of a reduction in replication rate. This was investigated by comparing determinations of the virus yield per unit of weight of insect cadaver. The response of the two species (to both viruses) was very different: the yield per unit of weight decreased over time for M. brassicae but increased for T. ni, The implications of these data for risk assessment of wild-type and genetically modified baculoviruses are discussed.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Hernandez-Crespo, P and Sait, S M and Hails, R S and Cory, J S},
 journal = {Applied and Environmental Microbiology},
 number = {3}
}
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