Pain processing in multisensory environments. Höfle, Marion, D., Hauck, M., Engel, A. K., & Senkowski, D. 1(2):23--28. 00003
Pain processing in multisensory environments [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
“Don’t look and it won’t hurt” is common advice heard before receiving an injection, but is there any truth in this statement? Pain processing can be separated into two major components: a sensory-discriminative component, which reflects the location and intensity of a painful event, and an affective-motivational component that reflects the unpleasantness of pain. The differentiation between these components and the effects of additional sensory inputs on them becomes apparent if you watch a needle penetrating your skin: On the one hand, it may be somewhat reassuring to know precisely when and where to expect the pinprick, on the other hand, you eye-witness damage inflicted on your body, which can increase personal distress. Here we review recent studies, which demonstrate that a host of variables such as onset timing, spatial alignment, semantic meaning, and attention differentially affect how visual inputs influence pain processing. These studies also indicate that there is some truth in the opening statement.
@article{ hofle_pain_2010,
  title = {Pain processing in multisensory environments},
  volume = {1},
  issn = {1868-856X},
  url = {http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s13295-010-0004-z},
  doi = {10.1007/s13295-010-0004-z},
  abstract = {“Don’t look and it won’t hurt” is common advice heard before receiving an injection, but is there any truth in this statement? Pain processing can be separated into two major components: a sensory-discriminative component, which reflects the location and intensity of a painful event, and an affective-motivational component that reflects the unpleasantness of pain. The differentiation between these components and the effects of additional sensory inputs on them becomes apparent if you watch a needle penetrating your skin: On the one hand, it may be somewhat reassuring to know precisely when and where to expect the pinprick, on the other hand, you eye-witness damage inflicted on your body, which can increase personal distress. Here we review recent studies, which demonstrate that a host of variables such as onset timing, spatial alignment, semantic meaning, and attention differentially affect how visual inputs influence pain processing. These studies also indicate that there is some truth in the opening statement.},
  pages = {23--28},
  number = {2},
  journaltitle = {e-Neuroforum},
  shortjournal = {e-Neuroforum},
  author = {Höfle, Dipl-Psych Marion and Hauck, M. and Engel, A. K. and Senkowski, D.},
  urldate = {2014-11-13},
  date = {2010-05-01},
  langid = {english},
  note = {00003},
  keywords = {Biomedicine general, cross-modal, {EEG}, Emotion, Life Sciences, general, {MEG}, Multisensory integration, neurobiology, Pain},
  file = {Höfle et al_2010_e-Neuroforum_Pain processing in multisensory environments.pdf:files/1334/Höfle et al_2010_e-Neuroforum_Pain processing in multisensory environments.pdf:application/pdf}
}
Downloads: 0