The Phylogeography of Eurasian Fraxinus Species Reveals Ancient Transcontinental Reticulation. Hinsinger, D. D., Gaudeul, M., Couloux, A., Bousquet, J., & Frascaria-Lacoste, N. 77:223–237.
The Phylogeography of Eurasian Fraxinus Species Reveals Ancient Transcontinental Reticulation [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
To investigate the biogeographical history of ashes species of the Eurasian section Fraxinus and to test the hypothesis of ancient reticulations, we sequenced nuclear DNA (nETS and nITS, 1075 bp) for 533 samples and scored AFLP for 63 samples of Eurasian ashes within the section Fraxinus. The nITS phylogeny retrieved the classical view of the evolution of the section, whereas nETS phylogeny indicated an unexpected separation of F. angustifolia in two paraphyletic groups, respectively found in southeastern Europe and in the other parts of the Mediterranean basin. In the nETS phylogeny, the former group was closely related to F. excelsior, whereas the later was closely related to F. mandshurica, a species which is restricted nowadays to northeastern Asia. This topological incongruence between the two loci indicated the occurrence of an ancient reticulation between European and Asian ash species. Several other ancient reticulation events between the two European species and the other species of the section were supported by the posterior predictive checking method. Some of these reticulation events would have occurred during the Miocene, when climatic variations may have lead these species to expand their distribution range and come into contact. The recurrent reticulations observed among Eurasian ash species indicate that they should be considered as conspecific taxa, with subspecific status for some groups. Altogether, the results of the present study provide a rare documented evidence for the occurrence of multiple ancient reticulations within a group of temperate tree taxa with modern disjunct distributions in Eurasia. These ancient reticulation events indicate that the speciation process is slow in ashes, necessitating long periods of geographical isolation. The implications for speciation processes in temperate trees with similar life history and reproductive biology are discussed.
@article{hinsingerPhylogeographyEurasianFraxinus2014,
  title = {The Phylogeography of {{Eurasian Fraxinus}} Species Reveals Ancient Transcontinental Reticulation},
  author = {Hinsinger, Damien D. and Gaudeul, Myriam and Couloux, Arnaud and Bousquet, Jean and Frascaria-Lacoste, Nathalie},
  date = {2014-08},
  journaltitle = {Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution},
  volume = {77},
  pages = {223--237},
  issn = {1055-7903},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ympev.2014.04.021},
  url = {https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2014.04.021},
  abstract = {To investigate the biogeographical history of ashes species of the Eurasian section Fraxinus and to test the hypothesis of ancient reticulations, we sequenced nuclear DNA (nETS and nITS, 1075 bp) for 533 samples and scored AFLP for 63 samples of Eurasian ashes within the section Fraxinus.

The nITS phylogeny retrieved the classical view of the evolution of the section, whereas nETS phylogeny indicated an unexpected separation of F. angustifolia in two paraphyletic groups, respectively found in southeastern Europe and in the other parts of the Mediterranean basin. In the nETS phylogeny, the former group was closely related to F. excelsior, whereas the later was closely related to F. mandshurica, a species which is restricted nowadays to northeastern Asia. This topological incongruence between the two loci indicated the occurrence of an ancient reticulation between European and Asian ash species. Several other ancient reticulation events between the two European species and the other species of the section were supported by the posterior predictive checking method. Some of these reticulation events would have occurred during the Miocene, when climatic variations may have lead these species to expand their distribution range and come into contact.

The recurrent reticulations observed among Eurasian ash species indicate that they should be considered as conspecific taxa, with subspecific status for some groups. Altogether, the results of the present study provide a rare documented evidence for the occurrence of multiple ancient reticulations within a group of temperate tree taxa with modern disjunct distributions in Eurasia. These ancient reticulation events indicate that the speciation process is slow in ashes, necessitating long periods of geographical isolation. The implications for speciation processes in temperate trees with similar life history and reproductive biology are discussed.},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-13507362,distribution,fraxinus-spp,genetic-diversity,phylogenetics}
}
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