Persisting Bark Beetle Outbreak Indicates the Unsustainability of Secondary Norway Spruce Forests: Case Study from Central Europe. Hlásny, T. & Turčáni, M. 70(5):481–491.
Persisting Bark Beetle Outbreak Indicates the Unsustainability of Secondary Norway Spruce Forests: Case Study from Central Europe [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
[Context] Secondary Norway spruce forests in the Western Beskids are among the most damaged forests in Europe. Although spruce bark beetle (Ips typographus) has been recently causing large-scale damage to these forests, our understanding of I. typographus dynamics in this environment is inadequate for evaluating forest sustainability. [Aim] This study aims to evaluate the patterns of damage caused by I. typographus to spruce forests with compromised ecological stability. [Methods] Forest infestation by I. typographus was inferred from sanitary felling data collected from 1998 to 2004. Stand and site data were obtained from forest management plans. Spatial-dependence analysis, ordinary kriging and neural network-based regression modelling were used to investigate the patterns of infestation and the casual relationships in the studied ecosystem. [Results] I. typographus long-distance dispersal substantially decreased with outbreak culmination. The spread of infestation was only weakly related to stand and site parameters. Infestations spread isotropically at the stand and patch level but directionally at the regional scale. [Conclusions] The large-scale spread of infestation can be explained by the uniform age and species composition of the investigated forests and by the ability of populations to overwhelm suboptimal trees. The observations presented here suggest that secondary spruce forests in Europe may be unsustainable due to unprecedented bark beetle outbreaks, which can be further amplified by changing climate.
@article{hlasnyPersistingBarkBeetle2013,
  title = {Persisting Bark Beetle Outbreak Indicates the Unsustainability of Secondary {{Norway}} Spruce Forests: Case Study from {{Central Europe}}},
  author = {Hlásny, Tomáš and Turčáni, Marek},
  date = {2013},
  journaltitle = {Annals of Forest Science},
  volume = {70},
  pages = {481--491},
  issn = {1297-966X},
  doi = {10.1007/s13595-013-0279-7},
  url = {https://doi.org/10.1007/s13595-013-0279-7},
  abstract = {[Context] Secondary Norway spruce forests in the Western Beskids are among the most damaged forests in Europe. Although spruce bark beetle (Ips typographus) has been recently causing large-scale damage to these forests, our understanding of I. typographus dynamics in this environment is inadequate for evaluating forest sustainability. 

[Aim] This study aims to evaluate the patterns of damage caused by I. typographus to spruce forests with compromised ecological stability. 

[Methods] Forest infestation by I. typographus was inferred from sanitary felling data collected from 1998 to 2004. Stand and site data were obtained from forest management plans. Spatial-dependence analysis, ordinary kriging and neural network-based regression modelling were used to investigate the patterns of infestation and the casual relationships in the studied ecosystem. 

[Results] I. typographus long-distance dispersal substantially decreased with outbreak culmination. The spread of infestation was only weakly related to stand and site parameters. Infestations spread isotropically at the stand and patch level but directionally at the regional scale. 

[Conclusions] The large-scale spread of infestation can be explained by the uniform age and species composition of the investigated forests and by the ability of populations to overwhelm suboptimal trees. The observations presented here suggest that secondary spruce forests in Europe may be unsustainable due to unprecedented bark beetle outbreaks, which can be further amplified by changing climate.},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-13561691,biodiversity,central-europe,forest-pests,forest-resources,ips-typographus,low-diversity,plant-health,species-decline,spruce-decline},
  number = {5}
}
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