Mycobacterial growth in human macrophages: variation according to donor, inoculum and bacterial strain. Hoal van Helden, E. G., Hon, D., Lewis, L. A., Beyers, N., & van Helden, P. D. Cell Biology International, 25(1):71–81, 2001.
doi  abstract   bibtex   
The microbicidal capacity of the macrophage is frequently evaded by mycobacteria, leading to tuberculosis (TB). We investigated a number of parameters affecting the rate of growth of mycobacteria in human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). The results show a great deal of variation in the growth of both Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis H37Rv, using a large number of human macrophage donors, (132 and 40, respectively), but no correlation was seen with the TB status of the MDM donor. Clumping of the mycobacteria resulted in more vigorous growth in MDM, suggesting that inoculum size could affect disease progression. The growth rates of 17 clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis were measured in macrophages derived from three donors and no consistent or marked differences between isolates were observed over the 5-day period of growth measurement. However, all 17 clinical strains grew consistently faster than H37Rv in the same experiments.
@article{hoal_van_helden_mycobacterial_2001,
	title = {Mycobacterial growth in human macrophages: variation according to donor, inoculum and bacterial strain},
	volume = {25},
	issn = {1065-6995},
	shorttitle = {Mycobacterial growth in human macrophages},
	doi = {10.1006/cbir.2000.0679},
	abstract = {The microbicidal capacity of the macrophage is frequently evaded by mycobacteria, leading to tuberculosis (TB). We investigated a number of parameters affecting the rate of growth of mycobacteria in human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). The results show a great deal of variation in the growth of both Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis H37Rv, using a large number of human macrophage donors, (132 and 40, respectively), but no correlation was seen with the TB status of the MDM donor. Clumping of the mycobacteria resulted in more vigorous growth in MDM, suggesting that inoculum size could affect disease progression. The growth rates of 17 clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis were measured in macrophages derived from three donors and no consistent or marked differences between isolates were observed over the 5-day period of growth measurement. However, all 17 clinical strains grew consistently faster than H37Rv in the same experiments.},
	language = {eng},
	number = {1},
	journal = {Cell Biology International},
	author = {Hoal van Helden, E. G. and Hon, D. and Lewis, L. A. and Beyers, N. and van Helden, P. D.},
	year = {2001},
	pmid = {11237410},
	keywords = {Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Cell Division, Disease Progression, Humans, Macrophages, Middle Aged, Mycobacterium bovis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Species Specificity, Time Factors, Tuberculosis},
	pages = {71--81},
}
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