Early Farmers from across Europe Directly Descended from Neolithic Aegeans. Hofmanová, Z., Kreutzer, S., Hellenthal, G., Sell, C., Diekmann, Y., D́ıez-del-Molino, D., van Dorp, L., López, S., Kousathanas, A., Link, V., Kirsanow, K., Cassidy, L. M., Martiniano, R., Strobel, M., Scheu, A., Kotsakis, K., Halstead, P., Triantaphyllou, S., Kyparissi-Apostolika, N., Urem-Kotsou, D., Ziota, C., Adaktylou, F., Gopalan, S., Bobo, D. M., Winkelbach, L., Blöcher, J., Unterländer, M., Leuenberger, C., Çilingiroğlu, Ç., Horejs, B., Gerritsen, F., Shennan, S. J., Bradley, D. G., Currat, M., Veeramah, K. R., Wegmann, D., Thomas, M. G., Papageorgopoulou, C., & Burger, J. 113(25):6886–6891.
Early Farmers from across Europe Directly Descended from Neolithic Aegeans [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
[Significance] One of the most enduring and widely debated questions in prehistoric archaeology concerns the origins of Europe's earliest farmers: Were they the descendants of local hunter-gatherers, or did they migrate from southwestern Asia, where farming began? We recover genome-wide DNA sequences from early farmers on both the European and Asian sides of the Aegean to reveal an unbroken chain of ancestry leading from central and southwestern Europe back to Greece and northwestern Anatolia. Our study provides the coup de grâce to the notion that farming spread into and across Europe via the dissemination of ideas but without, or with only a limited, migration of people. [Abstract] Farming and sedentism first appeared in southwestern Asia during the early Holocene and later spread to neighboring regions, including Europe, along multiple dispersal routes. Conspicuous uncertainties remain about the relative roles of migration, cultural diffusion, and admixture with local foragers in the early Neolithization of Europe. Here we present paleogenomic data for five Neolithic individuals from northern Greece and northwestern Turkey spanning the time and region of the earliest spread of farming into Europe. We use a novel approach to recalibrate raw reads and call genotypes from ancient DNA and observe striking genetic similarity both among Aegean early farmers and with those from across Europe. Our study demonstrates a direct genetic link between Mediterranean and Central European early farmers and those of Greece and Anatolia, extending the European Neolithic migratory chain all the way back to southwestern Asia.
@article{hofmanovaEarlyFarmersEurope2016,
  title = {Early Farmers from across {{Europe}} Directly Descended from {{Neolithic Aegeans}}},
  author = {Hofmanová, Zuzana and Kreutzer, Susanne and Hellenthal, Garrett and Sell, Christian and Diekmann, Yoan and D́ıez-del-Molino, David and van Dorp, Lucy and López, Saioa and Kousathanas, Athanasios and Link, Vivian and Kirsanow, Karola and Cassidy, Lara M. and Martiniano, Rui and Strobel, Melanie and Scheu, Amelie and Kotsakis, Kostas and Halstead, Paul and Triantaphyllou, Sevi and Kyparissi-Apostolika, Nina and Urem-Kotsou, Dushka and Ziota, Christina and Adaktylou, Fotini and Gopalan, Shyamalika and Bobo, Dean M. and Winkelbach, Laura and Blöcher, Jens and Unterländer, Martina and Leuenberger, Christoph and Çilingiroğlu, Çiler and Horejs, Barbara and Gerritsen, Fokke and Shennan, Stephen J. and Bradley, Daniel G. and Currat, Mathias and Veeramah, Krishna R. and Wegmann, Daniel and Thomas, Mark G. and Papageorgopoulou, Christina and Burger, Joachim},
  date = {2016-06},
  journaltitle = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences},
  volume = {113},
  pages = {6886--6891},
  issn = {1091-6490},
  doi = {10.1073/pnas.1523951113},
  url = {http://mfkp.org/INRMM/article/14073742},
  abstract = {[Significance]

One of the most enduring and widely debated questions in prehistoric archaeology concerns the origins of Europe's earliest farmers: Were they the descendants of local hunter-gatherers, or did they migrate from southwestern Asia, where farming began? We recover genome-wide DNA sequences from early farmers on both the European and Asian sides of the Aegean to reveal an unbroken chain of ancestry leading from central and southwestern Europe back to Greece and northwestern Anatolia. Our study provides the coup de grâce to the notion that farming spread into and across Europe via the dissemination of ideas but without, or with only a limited, migration of people.

[Abstract]

Farming and sedentism first appeared in southwestern Asia during the early Holocene and later spread to neighboring regions, including Europe, along multiple dispersal routes. Conspicuous uncertainties remain about the relative roles of migration, cultural diffusion, and admixture with local foragers in the early Neolithization of Europe. Here we present paleogenomic data for five Neolithic individuals from northern Greece and northwestern Turkey spanning the time and region of the earliest spread of farming into Europe. We use a novel approach to recalibrate raw reads and call genotypes from ancient DNA and observe striking genetic similarity both among Aegean early farmers and with those from across Europe. Our study demonstrates a direct genetic link between Mediterranean and Central European early farmers and those of Greece and Anatolia, extending the European Neolithic migratory chain all the way back to southwestern Asia.},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-14073742,~to-add-doi-URL,agricultural-land,agricultural-resources,anthropogenic-changes,europe,historical-perspective,migration-history},
  number = {25},
  options = {useprefix=true}
}
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