Sulfur dioxide uptake and oxidation in sea-salt aerosol. Hoppel, W., Pasternack, L., Caffrey, P., Frick, G., Fitzgerald, J., Hegg, D., Gao, S., Ambrusko, J., & Albrechcinski, T. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, 106(D21):27575-27585, 2001.
abstract   bibtex   
Measurements Of SO2 and O-3 uptake by sea-salt and NaCl aerosol were made in a 600 m(3) environmental chamber by measuring the rate Of SO2 and O-3 depletion during nebulization of seawater and NaCl solutions. The experiments were carried out with starting relative humidity between 80% and 92%, with SO2 concentrations between 35 and 60 ppb, and ozone concentrations between 0 and 110 ppb. For NaCl, no SO2 or O-3 uptake was observed. For sea-salt aerosol, uptake in the range of 0.21 and 1.2 millimoles of S per liter of (nebulized) seawater was observed. Surprisingly, no O-3 uptake was observed even though the residence time of the aerosol in the chamber was long compared to the time required for the predicted S(IV)-O-3 reaction to occur. Several S(IV) oxidation schemes are considered to explain these observations. The Cl-catalyzed aerobic mechanism as formulated by Zhang and Millero [ 1991] from empirical data best explains our observations. The Cl- catalyzed S(IV) reaction decreases rapidly with decreasing pH, making it important only at pH > similar to5.5. This rapid decrease with pH explains why SO2 uptake was not observed in the NaCl aerosol and observed at a level approaching the seasalt alkalinity in the case of sea-salt aerosol.
@article{
 title = {Sulfur dioxide uptake and oxidation in sea-salt aerosol},
 type = {article},
 year = {2001},
 keywords = {Marine boundary-layer,catalyzed oxidation,droplets,mass-transport limitation,mechanism,size distribution,so2,solubility,sulfate production,water},
 pages = {27575-27585},
 volume = {106},
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 last_modified = {2015-05-08T02:28:34.000Z},
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 source_type = {Journal Article},
 abstract = {Measurements Of SO2 and O-3 uptake by sea-salt and NaCl aerosol were made in a 600 m(3) environmental chamber by measuring the rate Of SO2 and O-3 depletion during nebulization of seawater and NaCl solutions. The experiments were carried out with starting relative humidity between 80% and 92%, with SO2 concentrations between 35 and 60 ppb, and ozone concentrations between 0 and 110 ppb. For NaCl, no SO2 or O-3 uptake was observed. For sea-salt aerosol, uptake in the range of 0.21 and 1.2 millimoles of S per liter of (nebulized) seawater was observed. Surprisingly, no O-3 uptake was observed even though the residence time of the aerosol in the chamber was long compared to the time required for the predicted S(IV)-O-3 reaction to occur. Several S(IV) oxidation schemes are considered to explain these observations. The Cl-catalyzed aerobic mechanism as formulated by Zhang and Millero [ 1991] from empirical data best explains our observations. The Cl- catalyzed S(IV) reaction decreases rapidly with decreasing pH, making it important only at pH > similar to5.5. This rapid decrease with pH explains why SO2 uptake was not observed in the NaCl aerosol and observed at a level approaching the seasalt alkalinity in the case of sea-salt aerosol.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Hoppel, W and Pasternack, L and Caffrey, P and Frick, G and Fitzgerald, J and Hegg, D and Gao, S and Ambrusko, J and Albrechcinski, T},
 journal = {Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres},
 number = {D21}
}
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