Ailanthus. Hu, S. Y. 39(2):29–50.
Ailanthus [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
Ailanthus is called tree of heaven by some people. In its homeland, China, It Is known as Chun Situ, pronounced almost like 'train' and ” sure” in English. Of all the trees introduced from China into American gardens, ailanthus Is the most widely naturalized. The specimens in the Harvard University Herbaria indicate that the species Ailanthus altissima (Miller) Swingle runs wild from Massachusetts in the East to Oregon in the West, and from Toronto, Canada in North America to Tucuman, Argentina (and Buenos Aires, by reference) in South America. In neglected areas of large cities such as Boston, ailanthus grows as trees close to buildings, as hedges, or as bushy aggregates along railroad tracks, highway embankments, walls at the ends of bridges and overpasses, or in cracks of sidewalks and along boundary fences between properties (FIgs. 1-2). Around some dwellings the trees are so close to the windows that they prevent light and sunshine from penetrating the rooms, or they send roots to invade the sewers or damage the foundations. Once ailanthus is established, It becomes very difficult to eradicate, for it can sprout from the stumps and on any portion of a root (Fig. 3. left), moreover, a female tree produces a large amount of winged fruits that spread and germinate In the gardens near, or even far away from, the mother plant. For these reasons, ailanthus has been maligned as a weedy tree by city dwellers. Lately, however, It has attracted the interest of environmentalists, and many of them have asked me questions about the tree both by telephone and in letters. This article contains a summary of the answers to some of the queries. It includes general characteristics of the species Ailanthus altissima, a history of Its introduction from North China to Europe and thence to America, a review of its early uses in America, my observation of ailanthus in China and its position In Chinese culture, and finally comments on the future of ailanthus as a tree of economic Importance In the United States of America. This article is prepared for the information of the general public; specific material on taxonomy is not included. Phytogeographically the range of the genus Ailanthus is primarily Southeastern Asia and the Pacific Islands. Ailanthus altissima is the only species that can grow in the temperate or cold temperate regions.
@article{huAilanthus1979,
  title = {Ailanthus},
  author = {Hu, S. Y.},
  date = {1979},
  journaltitle = {Arnoldia},
  volume = {39},
  pages = {29--50},
  url = {http://www.jstor.org/discover/10.2307/42954660?sid=21105298609021&uid=3738296&uid=67&uid=3&uid=62&uid=2656848&uid=2657184&uid=2},
  abstract = {Ailanthus is called tree of heaven by some people. In its homeland, China, It Is known as Chun Situ, pronounced almost like 'train' and ” sure” in English. Of all the trees introduced from China into American gardens, ailanthus Is the most widely naturalized. The specimens in the Harvard University Herbaria indicate that the species Ailanthus altissima (Miller) Swingle runs wild from Massachusetts in the East to Oregon in the West, and from Toronto, Canada in North America to Tucuman, Argentina (and Buenos Aires, by reference) in South America. In neglected areas of large cities such as Boston, ailanthus grows as trees close to buildings, as hedges, or as bushy aggregates along railroad tracks, highway embankments, walls at the ends of bridges and overpasses, or in cracks of sidewalks and along boundary fences between properties (FIgs. 1-2). Around some dwellings the trees are so close to the windows that they prevent light and sunshine from penetrating the rooms, or they send roots to invade the sewers or damage the foundations. Once ailanthus is established, It becomes very difficult to eradicate, for it can sprout from the stumps and on any portion of a root (Fig. 3. left), moreover, a female tree produces a large amount of winged fruits that spread and germinate In the gardens near, or even far away from, the mother plant. For these reasons, ailanthus has been maligned as a weedy tree by city dwellers. Lately, however, It has attracted the interest of environmentalists, and many of them have asked me questions about the tree both by telephone and in letters. This article contains a summary of the answers to some of the queries. It includes general characteristics of the species Ailanthus altissima, a history of Its introduction from North China to Europe and thence to America, a review of its early uses in America, my observation of ailanthus in China and its position In Chinese culture, and finally comments on the future of ailanthus as a tree of economic Importance In the United States of America. This article is prepared for the information of the general public; specific material on taxonomy is not included. Phytogeographically the range of the genus Ailanthus is primarily Southeastern Asia and the Pacific Islands. Ailanthus altissima is the only species that can grow in the temperate or cold temperate regions.},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-13512657,ailanthus-altissima},
  number = {2}
}
Downloads: 0