The human body burden of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and their relationships with thyroid hormones in the general population in Northern China. Huang, F., Wen, S., Li, J., Zhong, Y., Zhao, Y., & Wu, Y. Science of The Total Environment, 466–467:609--615, January, 2014.
The human body burden of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and their relationships with thyroid hormones in the general population in Northern China [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
This study was conducted to determine the human body burden of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and then clarify the relationships between that and the disruption of thyroid hormones in the general population in Northern China. Between November 2010 and May 2011, 124 serum samples were obtained from volunteers from the provinces of Shanxi and Liaoning. Serum samples were prepared by solid-phase extraction and analyzed for BDE-17, 28, 47, 66, 99, 100, 153, 154, 183 and 209 by gas chromatography–negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry. The median concentration of the total PBDEs was 7.2 ng/g lipid weights (lw); concentrations ranged from 2.1 to 160.3 ng/g lw. The PBDE profiles in this study differed from those of other general populations. BDE-209 was the most abundant congener (median, 5.0 ng/g lw; range, non-detected — 157.1 ng/g lw), accounting for more than 75% of the total PBDEs, followed by BDE-153. The total PBDE concentrations in men were significantly higher as compared to women. The donors' age was correlated with a few PBDE congeners, but was not correlated with the total PBDE concentrations. The overall level of PBDEs in this study was lower than that observed in general populations in Southern China, Europe, and North America. There were apparent correlations between concentrations of several PBDE congeners and thyroid hormones. Triiodothyronine (T3) was correlated with BDE-99 and 209 and inversely correlated with BDE-17, 28, 47, 153, 183, and the summed tri- to hepta-PBDE congeners (∑3–7PBDEs). Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) was correlated with BDE-17, 28, 47, and 183 and inversely correlated with BDE-99. No correlation between free tetraidothyronine (FT4) and PBDEs was observed. Logistic regression analysis results indicated that those with higher levels of BDE-17 or BDE-153 had significantly lower odds of having T3 levels above the normal range compared to those with lower levels of BDE-17 or BDE-153. Association between FT4 and BDE-153 disappeared after controlling for sex and age. However, there was no significant association between TSH and PBDEs. The results of the present study showed that even at a relatively low level, PBDEs might interfere with the thyroid hormone levels in the general population.
@article{huang_human_2014,
	title = {The human body burden of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and their relationships with thyroid hormones in the general population in {Northern} {China}},
	volume = {466–467},
	issn = {0048-9697},
	url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0048969713007766},
	doi = {10.1016/j.scitotenv.2013.07.008},
	abstract = {This study was conducted to determine the human body burden of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and then clarify the relationships between that and the disruption of thyroid hormones in the general population in Northern China. Between November 2010 and May 2011, 124 serum samples were obtained from volunteers from the provinces of Shanxi and Liaoning. Serum samples were prepared by solid-phase extraction and analyzed for BDE-17, 28, 47, 66, 99, 100, 153, 154, 183 and 209 by gas chromatography–negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry. The median concentration of the total PBDEs was 7.2 ng/g lipid weights (lw); concentrations ranged from 2.1 to 160.3 ng/g lw. The PBDE profiles in this study differed from those of other general populations. BDE-209 was the most abundant congener (median, 5.0 ng/g lw; range, non-detected — 157.1 ng/g lw), accounting for more than 75\% of the total PBDEs, followed by BDE-153. The total PBDE concentrations in men were significantly higher as compared to women. The donors' age was correlated with a few PBDE congeners, but was not correlated with the total PBDE concentrations. The overall level of PBDEs in this study was lower than that observed in general populations in Southern China, Europe, and North America. There were apparent correlations between concentrations of several PBDE congeners and thyroid hormones. Triiodothyronine (T3) was correlated with BDE-99 and 209 and inversely correlated with BDE-17, 28, 47, 153, 183, and the summed tri- to hepta-PBDE congeners (∑3–7PBDEs). Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) was correlated with BDE-17, 28, 47, and 183 and inversely correlated with BDE-99. No correlation between free tetraidothyronine (FT4) and PBDEs was observed. Logistic regression analysis results indicated that those with higher levels of BDE-17 or BDE-153 had significantly lower odds of having T3 levels above the normal range compared to those with lower levels of BDE-17 or BDE-153. Association between FT4 and BDE-153 disappeared after controlling for sex and age. However, there was no significant association between TSH and PBDEs. The results of the present study showed that even at a relatively low level, PBDEs might interfere with the thyroid hormone levels in the general population.},
	urldate = {2014-08-25TZ},
	journal = {Science of The Total Environment},
	author = {Huang, Feifei and Wen, Sheng and Li, Jingguang and Zhong, Yuxin and Zhao, Yunfeng and Wu, Yongning},
	month = jan,
	year = {2014},
	keywords = {Blood, Body burden, Free tetraidothyronine (FT4), Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), Triiodothyronine (T3)},
	pages = {609--615}
}

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