Debris-Flow Mitigation Measures. Huebl, J. & Fiebiger, G. In Debris-Flow Hazards and Related Phenomena, of Springer Praxis Books, pages 445–487. Springer Berlin Heidelberg.
Debris-Flow Mitigation Measures [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
[Excerpt] Integrated risk management is a tool to prevent, intervent, and avoid natural hazards (Amman, 2001). This includes a combination of land use planning and technical and bioengineering measures to guarantee an optimal cost-benefit ratio. An essential aspect of risk management is the design of mitigation measures which reduce the existing risk to an accepted level of residual risk. Two types of mitigation measures can be distinguished (Zollinger, 1985): active measures and passive measures. Active measures focus on the hazard, while passive measures focus on the potential damage (Huebl and Steinwendtner, 2000; Kienholz, 2003). It is of fundamental importance to risk management to clearly define the spatial and temporal objectives of the desired degree of protection, with an understanding of acceptable residual risk. The strategy of protection describes the best combination of protection measures (Figure 18.1). Once protection objectives have been established from the risk assessment, the protection concept describes the strategy selected to reach those targets. Therefore, special management tasks are assigned for unique elements of the watershed. Each task defines a desired modification of the debris-flow system and the performance of the elements with regard to the hazard. Ultimately, the sum of each element's functions must lead to the fulfilment of the overall protection objective (Huebl, 2001). [...] [Conclusion] In this chapter only a few examples of debris-flow mitigation measures are described. There are a large variety of measures that can be combined in different ways. For selecting the best adjusted arrangement great importance should be given to the knowledge of all ongoing geomorphic processes and their possible interaction with the mitigation measures. This means a multidisciplinary approach has to be applied, including specialized skills in applied geology, geomorphology, hydrology, ̄uid dynamics, forestry, and structural engineering. [\n] Although there is a large pool of experience gained by practitioners working in this field of activity, a lot of scientific gaps still exist. The rare occurrence of debris ̄ows of design magnitude obliges the engineers to visualize the effect of the mitigation measures on the initiation, transportation, and deposition of the debris flow. Therefore, it is most important to collect and exchange the experience of existing mitigation measures worldwide. [\n] Beside the assignment of technical structures, hazard mapping in combination with land-use planning seems to be a proper and cost-effective tool to reduce future losses
@incollection{hueblDebrisflowMitigationMeasures2005,
  title = {Debris-Flow Mitigation Measures},
  booktitle = {Debris-Flow {{Hazards}} and {{Related Phenomena}}},
  author = {Huebl, Johannes and Fiebiger, Gernot},
  date = {2005},
  pages = {445--487},
  publisher = {{Springer Berlin Heidelberg}},
  doi = {10.1007/3-540-27129-5\\_18},
  url = {https://doi.org/10.1007/3-540-27129-5_18},
  abstract = {[Excerpt] Integrated risk management is a tool to prevent, intervent, and avoid natural hazards (Amman, 2001). This includes a combination of land use planning and technical and bioengineering measures to guarantee an optimal cost-benefit ratio. An essential aspect of risk management is the design of mitigation measures which reduce the existing risk to an accepted level of residual risk. Two types of mitigation measures can be distinguished (Zollinger, 1985): active measures and passive measures. Active measures focus on the hazard, while passive measures focus on the potential damage (Huebl and Steinwendtner, 2000; Kienholz, 2003). It is of fundamental importance to risk management to clearly define the spatial and temporal objectives of the desired degree of protection, with an understanding of acceptable residual risk. The strategy of protection describes the best combination of protection measures (Figure 18.1). Once protection objectives have been established from the risk assessment, the protection concept describes the strategy selected to reach those targets. Therefore, special management tasks are assigned for unique elements of the watershed. Each task defines a desired modification of the debris-flow system and the performance of the elements with regard to the hazard. Ultimately, the sum of each element's functions must lead to the fulfilment of the overall protection objective (Huebl, 2001).

[...]

[Conclusion] In this chapter only a few examples of debris-flow mitigation measures are described. There are a large variety of measures that can be combined in different ways. For selecting the best adjusted arrangement great importance should be given to the knowledge of all ongoing geomorphic processes and their possible interaction with the mitigation measures. This means a multidisciplinary approach has to be applied, including specialized skills in applied geology, geomorphology, hydrology, ̄uid dynamics, forestry, and structural engineering.

[\textbackslash n] Although there is a large pool of experience gained by practitioners working in this field of activity, a lot of scientific gaps still exist. The rare occurrence of debris ̄ows of design magnitude obliges the engineers to visualize the effect of the mitigation measures on the initiation, transportation, and deposition of the debris flow. Therefore, it is most important to collect and exchange the experience of existing mitigation measures worldwide.

[\textbackslash n] Beside the assignment of technical structures, hazard mapping in combination with land-use planning seems to be a proper and cost-effective tool to reduce future losses},
  isbn = {978-3-540-20726-9},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-13845058,~to-add-doi-URL,alnus-spp,austria,betula-pendula,debris-flows,fagus-sylvatica,forest-resources,fraxinus-excelsior,larix-decidua,mitigation,mountainous-areas,picea-abies,pinus-cembra,pinus-mugo,salix-spp,soil-erosion,soil-resources},
  series = {Springer {{Praxis Books}}}
}
Downloads: 0