Temperature, demography, and ectotherm fitness. Huey, R., B. & Berrigan, D. The American naturalist, 158(2):204-210, 8, 2001.
Temperature, demography, and ectotherm fitness. [link]Website  abstract   bibtex   
The impact of temperature on Darwinian fitness of ec- totherms can be depicted similarly. However, one must first choose an appropriate measure of fitness (Stearns 1982). Several measures are available (Tuljupurkar 1990; Roff 1992; Stearns 1992; Carey 1993; Kozlowski 1993; Charlesworth 1994), but r (“intrinsic rate of increase”; see “Material and Methods”) and Ro (“net reproductive rate”; see “Material and Methods”) are by far the two most com- monly used ones. The intrinsic rate of increase is the rate of population increase in a closed population, assuming constant age-specific schedules of death and reproduction and a stable age distribution, whereas the net reproductive rate is the average number of female offspring born to a female over her lifetime, again assuming constant age- specific schedules of death and reproduction (Carey 1993). Both measures estimate population growth rates, but r is scaled to time, whereas Ro is scaled per generation and is independent of time. Surprisingly, however, whether these alternative fitness measures have parallel responses to tem- perature has not previously been addressed systematically. Should r and Ro actually have different temperature sen- sitivities, then biologists attempting to predict how pop- ulations will respond to climate change (e.g., Dunham 1993; Huey and Kingsolver 1993; Lynch and Lande 1993; Wennergren and Landin 1993) will need to select between these alternative fitness measures with special care (Travis and Henrich 1986).
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 title = {Temperature, demography, and ectotherm fitness.},
 type = {article},
 year = {2001},
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 keywords = {and lower vertebrates,correlates of fitness,ectotherm,fitness,hochachka,increase,intrinsic rate of,invertebrates,net reproductive rate,on ectotherms such as,plants,temperature,temperature has profound effects,thermal sensitivity},
 pages = {204-210},
 volume = {158},
 websites = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18707349},
 month = {8},
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 abstract = {The impact of temperature on Darwinian fitness of ec- totherms can be depicted similarly. However, one must first choose an appropriate measure of fitness (Stearns 1982). Several measures are available (Tuljupurkar 1990; Roff 1992; Stearns 1992; Carey 1993; Kozlowski 1993; Charlesworth 1994), but r (“intrinsic rate of increase”; see “Material and Methods”) and Ro (“net reproductive rate”; see “Material and Methods”) are by far the two most com- monly used ones. The intrinsic rate of increase is the rate of population increase in a closed population, assuming constant age-specific schedules of death and reproduction and a stable age distribution, whereas the net reproductive rate is the average number of female offspring born to a female over her lifetime, again assuming constant age- specific schedules of death and reproduction (Carey 1993). Both measures estimate population growth rates, but r is scaled to time, whereas Ro is scaled per generation and is independent of time. Surprisingly, however, whether these alternative fitness measures have parallel responses to tem- perature has not previously been addressed systematically. Should r and Ro actually have different temperature sen- sitivities, then biologists attempting to predict how pop- ulations will respond to climate change (e.g., Dunham 1993; Huey and Kingsolver 1993; Lynch and Lande 1993; Wennergren and Landin 1993) will need to select between these alternative fitness measures with special care (Travis and Henrich 1986).},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Huey, Raymond B and Berrigan, D},
 journal = {The American naturalist},
 number = {2}
}
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