Historical Notes on Hazelnut in Oregon. Hummer, K. E. 556:25–28.
Historical Notes on Hazelnut in Oregon [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
Since the glacial age, Corylus L., the hazelnut (filbert), has provided food for indigenous peoples throughout the Northern Hemisphere. Corylus cornuta var. californica (A. D.C.) W.M. Sharp, native throughout Oregon and California, was eaten by Indian tribes and was bartered to explorers such as Lewis and Clark, in 1805, and botanist David Douglas, in 1825, during their journeys in this territory. Shortly after 1847, Henderson Lewelling, an early Oregon nurseryman, first imported C. avellana 'Cob' filbert nuts from England and 'Red Aveline' nuts from Hapsburg, Austria. In the mid-1850's hazelnuts were brought to Scottsburg, OR. Three 150 year-old C. avellana trees can now be seen in this town. These are probably the oldest hazelnut trees in Oregon. In 1885, nurseryman Felix Gillet, a Frenchman who moved to Nevada City, CA, sold specific varieties of hazelnut trees throughout the Northwest. He distributed 'Barcelona' which is widely planted in Oregon today. In 1886, George Steel bought 86 seedlings from Gillet for planting in Portland. In 1900, George A. Dorris of Springfield, Oregon, developed the first significant hazelnut acreage with the varieties 'Barcelona,' 'DuChilly,' 'White Aveline,' 'Red Aveline,' and 'Daviana.' In 1905, he bought more than 200 trees from J. B. Pilkington, a Portland nurseryman. During the next two years, hazelnut orchards were started in Wilsonville, Gresham, Newberg, Dundee, and Dilley. By 1950, Oregon produced 5,350 tons of hazelnuts. This production has increased almost nine-fold in recent years. The Oregon Agricultural Experiment Station has been studying hazelnuts since 1908, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture has been involved in hazelnut research in Oregon since 1929.
@article{hummerHistoricalNotesHazelnut2001,
  title = {Historical Notes on Hazelnut in {{Oregon}}},
  author = {Hummer, K. E.},
  date = {2001},
  journaltitle = {Acta Horticulturae},
  volume = {556},
  pages = {25--28},
  issn = {0567-7572},
  url = {http://mfkp.org/INRMM/article/13528684},
  abstract = {Since the glacial age, Corylus L., the hazelnut (filbert), has provided food for indigenous peoples throughout the Northern Hemisphere. Corylus cornuta var. californica (A. D.C.) W.M. Sharp, native throughout Oregon and California, was eaten by Indian tribes and was bartered to explorers such as Lewis and Clark, in 1805, and botanist David Douglas, in 1825, during their journeys in this territory. Shortly after 1847, Henderson Lewelling, an early Oregon nurseryman, first imported C. avellana 'Cob' filbert nuts from England and 'Red Aveline' nuts from Hapsburg, Austria. In the mid-1850's hazelnuts were brought to Scottsburg, OR. Three 150 year-old C. avellana trees can now be seen in this town. These are probably the oldest hazelnut trees in Oregon. In 1885, nurseryman Felix Gillet, a Frenchman who moved to Nevada City, CA, sold specific varieties of hazelnut trees throughout the Northwest. He distributed 'Barcelona' which is widely planted in Oregon today. In 1886, George Steel bought 86 seedlings from Gillet for planting in Portland. In 1900, George A. Dorris of Springfield, Oregon, developed the first significant hazelnut acreage with the varieties 'Barcelona,' 'DuChilly,' 'White Aveline,' 'Red Aveline,' and 'Daviana.' In 1905, he bought more than 200 trees from J. B. Pilkington, a Portland nurseryman. During the next two years, hazelnut orchards were started in Wilsonville, Gresham, Newberg, Dundee, and Dilley. By 1950, Oregon produced 5,350 tons of hazelnuts. This production has increased almost nine-fold in recent years. The Oregon Agricultural Experiment Station has been studying hazelnuts since 1908, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture has been involved in hazelnut research in Oregon since 1929.},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-13528684,corylus-avellana,forest-resources,historical-perspective,oregon}
}
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