Comprehensive characterization of atmospheric organic carbon at a forested site. Hunter, J., F., Day, D., A., Palm, B., B., Yatavelli, R., L., Chan, A., W., Kaser, L., Cappellin, L., Hayes, P., L., Cross, E., S., Carrasquillo, A., J., Campuzano-Jost, P., Stark, H., Zhao, Y., Hohaus, T., Smith, J., N., Hansel, A., Karl, T., Goldstein, A., H., Guenther, A., Worsnop, D., R., Thornton, J., A., Heald, C., L., Jimenez, J., L., & Kroll, J., H. Nature Geoscience, 10(10):748-753, 2017.
abstract   bibtex   
Atmospheric organic compounds are central to key chemical processes that influence air quality, ecological health, and climate. However, longstanding difficulties in predicting important quantities such as organic aerosol formation and oxidant lifetimes indicate that our understanding of atmospheric organic chemistry is fundamentally incomplete, probably due in part to the presence of organic species that are unmeasured using standard analytical techniques. Here we present measurements of a wide range of atmospheric organic compounds - including previously unmeasured species - taken concurrently at a single site (a ponderosa pine forest during summertime) by five state-of-the-art mass spectrometric instruments. The combined data set provides a comprehensive characterization of atmospheric organic carbon, covering a wide range in chemical properties (volatility, oxidation state, and molecular size), and exhibiting no obvious measurement gaps. This enables the first construction of a measurement-based local organic budget, highlighting the high emission, deposition, and oxidation fluxes in this environment. Moreover, previously unmeasured species, including semivolatile and intermediate-volatility organic species (S/IVOCs), account for one-third of the total organic carbon, and (within error) provide closure on both OH reactivity and potential secondary organic aerosol formation.
@article{
 title = {Comprehensive characterization of atmospheric organic carbon at a forested site},
 type = {article},
 year = {2017},
 identifiers = {[object Object]},
 keywords = {ponderosa pine forest volatility basis-set beachon},
 pages = {748-753},
 volume = {10},
 city = {[Hunter, James F.; Carrasquillo, Anthony J.; Heald, Colette L.; Kroll, Jesse H.] MIT, Dept Civil & Environm Engn, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA. [Hunter, James F.; Cross, Eben S.] MIT, Dept Mat Sci & Engn, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA. [Day, Douglas A.; Palm, Brett },
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 last_modified = {2020-08-21T23:00:49.477Z},
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 citation_key = {Hunter2017},
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 language = {English},
 notes = {ISI Document Delivery No.: FI6JV<br/>Times Cited: 0<br/>Cited Reference Count: 48<br/>Hunter, James F. Day, Douglas A. Palm, Brett B. Yatavelli, Reddy L. N. Chan, ArthurW. H. Kaser, Lisa Cappellin, Luca Hayes, Patrick L. Cross, Eben S. Carrasquillo, Anthony J. Campuzano-Jost, Pedro Stark, Harald Zhao, Yunliang Hohaus, Thorsten Smith, James N. Hansel, Armin Karl, Thomas Goldstein, Allen H. Guenther, Alex Worsnop, Douglas R. Thornton, Joel A. Heald, Colette L. Jimenez, Jose L. Kroll, Jesse H.<br/>NOAA [NA10OAR4310106]; NSF [ATM-0919189, AGS-1243354, RAPID 1135745, AGS-1238109]; DOE [DE-SC0011105]; US EPA STAR [FP-91761701-0]; Drefyus Foundation; Austrian Science Fund (FWF) [L518-N20]; DOC-FORTE-fellowship of the Austrian Academy of Science; DOE SBIR [DE-FG02-08ER85160, DE-SC0004577, DE-SC0001666]<br/>Compilation of the multi-instrument data was supported by NOAA grant NA10OAR4310106. Contributions from individual researchers were supported by NOAA NA10OAR4310106 (J.F.H., E.S.C., A.J.C. and J.H.K.); NSF ATM-0919189, NSF AGS-1243354, and DOE DE-SC0011105 (D.A.D., R.L.N.Y., P.L.H., B.B.P., P.C.-J., H.S. and J.L.J.); US EPA STAR Graduate Fellowship FP-91761701-0 (B.B.P.); NSF RAPID 1135745 (A.W.H.C., Y.Z. and A.H.G.); the Drefyus Foundation (E.S.C.); Austrian Science Fund (FWF) project number L518-N20 (A.H. and L.K.) DOC-FORTE-fellowship of the Austrian Academy of Science (L.K.) and NSF AGS-1238109 (C.L.H.). The SV-TAG, CIMS, and TD EIMS were developed with support from the DOE SBIR program, grants DE-FG02-08ER85160, DE-FG02-08ER85160, DE-SC0004577, and DE-SC0001666. The authors are grateful to A. Turnipseed and the management of the Manitou Experimental Forest Observatory for field support, to N. Grossberg and B. Lefer for their measurements of boundary layer heights, to N. Kreisberg and S. Hering for their development and support of the SV-TAG, and to A. Steiner for helpful discussions regarding vertical mixing.<br/>Nature publishing group<br/>New york},
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 abstract = {Atmospheric organic compounds are central to key chemical processes that influence air quality, ecological health, and climate. However, longstanding difficulties in predicting important quantities such as organic aerosol formation and oxidant lifetimes indicate that our understanding of atmospheric organic chemistry is fundamentally incomplete, probably due in part to the presence of organic species that are unmeasured using standard analytical techniques. Here we present measurements of a wide range of atmospheric organic compounds - including previously unmeasured species - taken concurrently at a single site (a ponderosa pine forest during summertime) by five state-of-the-art mass spectrometric instruments. The combined data set provides a comprehensive characterization of atmospheric organic carbon, covering a wide range in chemical properties (volatility, oxidation state, and molecular size), and exhibiting no obvious measurement gaps. This enables the first construction of a measurement-based local organic budget, highlighting the high emission, deposition, and oxidation fluxes in this environment. Moreover, previously unmeasured species, including semivolatile and intermediate-volatility organic species (S/IVOCs), account for one-third of the total organic carbon, and (within error) provide closure on both OH reactivity and potential secondary organic aerosol formation.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Hunter, James F. and Day, Douglas A. and Palm, Brett B. and Yatavelli, Reddy L.N. and Chan, Arthur W.H. and Kaser, Lisa and Cappellin, Luca and Hayes, Patrick L. and Cross, Eben S. and Carrasquillo, Anthony J. and Campuzano-Jost, Pedro and Stark, Harald and Zhao, Yunliang and Hohaus, Thorsten and Smith, James N. and Hansel, Armin and Karl, Thomas and Goldstein, Allen H. and Guenther, Alex and Worsnop, Douglas R. and Thornton, Joel A. and Heald, Colette L. and Jimenez, Jose L. and Kroll, Jesse H.},
 journal = {Nature Geoscience},
 number = {10}
}

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