Intake of vitamin D and risk of type 1 diabetes: a birth-cohort study. Hyppönen, E., Läärä, E., Reunanen, A., Järvelin, M., & Virtanen, S. M. The Lancet, 358(9292):1500–1503, November, 2001. Publisher: Elsevier
Intake of vitamin D and risk of type 1 diabetes: a birth-cohort study [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
\textlessh2\textgreaterSummary\textless/h2\textgreater\textlessh3\textgreaterBackground\textless/h3\textgreater\textlessp\textgreaterDietary vitamin D supplementation is associated with reduced risk of type 1 diabetes in animals. Our aim was to ascertain whether or not vitamin D supplementation or deficiency in infancy could affect development of type 1 diabetes.\textless/p\textgreater\textlessh3\textgreaterMethods\textless/h3\textgreater\textlessp\textgreaterA birth-cohort study was done, in which all pregnant women (n=12 055) in Oulu and Lapland, northern Finland, who were due to give birth in 1966 were enrolled. Data was collected in the first year of life about frequency and dose of vitamin D supplementation and presence of suspected rickets. Our primary outcome measure was diagnosis of type 1 diabetes by end of December, 1997.\textless/p\textgreater\textlessh3\textgreaterFindings\textless/h3\textgreater\textlessp\textgreater12 058 of 12 231 represented live births, and 10 821 (91% of those alive) children were followed-up at age 1 year. Of the 10 366 children included in analyses, 81 were diagnosed with diabetes during the study. Vitamin D supplementation was associated with a decreased frequency of type 1 diabetes when adjusted for neonatal, anthropometric, and social characteristics (rate ratio [RR] for regular vs no supplementation 0·12, 95% Cl 0·03–0·51, and irregular vs no supplementation 0·16, 0·04–0·74. Children who regularly took the recommended dose of vitamin D (2000 IU daily) had a RR of 0·22 (0·05–0·89) compared with those who regularly received less than the recommended amount. Children suspected of having rickets during the first year of life had a RR of 3·0 (1·0–9·0) compared with those without such a suspicion.\textless/p\textgreater\textlessh3\textgreaterInterpretation\textless/h3\textgreater\textlessp\textgreaterDietary vitamin D supplementation is associated with reduced risk of type 1 diabetes. Ensuring adequate vitamin D supplementation for infants could help to reverse the increasing trend in the incidence of type 1 diabetes.\textless/p\textgreater
@article{hypponen_intake_2001,
	title = {Intake of vitamin {D} and risk of type 1 diabetes: a birth-cohort study},
	volume = {358},
	issn = {0140-6736, 1474-547X},
	shorttitle = {Intake of vitamin {D} and risk of type 1 diabetes},
	url = {https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(01)06580-1/abstract},
	doi = {10.1016/S0140-6736(01)06580-1},
	abstract = {{\textless}h2{\textgreater}Summary{\textless}/h2{\textgreater}{\textless}h3{\textgreater}Background{\textless}/h3{\textgreater}{\textless}p{\textgreater}Dietary vitamin D supplementation is associated with reduced risk of type 1 diabetes in animals. Our aim was to ascertain whether or not vitamin D supplementation or deficiency in infancy could affect development of type 1 diabetes.{\textless}/p{\textgreater}{\textless}h3{\textgreater}Methods{\textless}/h3{\textgreater}{\textless}p{\textgreater}A birth-cohort study was done, in which all pregnant women (n=12 055) in Oulu and Lapland, northern Finland, who were due to give birth in 1966 were enrolled. Data was collected in the first year of life about frequency and dose of vitamin D supplementation and presence of suspected rickets. Our primary outcome measure was diagnosis of type 1 diabetes by end of December, 1997.{\textless}/p{\textgreater}{\textless}h3{\textgreater}Findings{\textless}/h3{\textgreater}{\textless}p{\textgreater}12 058 of 12 231 represented live births, and 10 821 (91\% of those alive) children were followed-up at age 1 year. Of the 10 366 children included in analyses, 81 were diagnosed with diabetes during the study. Vitamin D supplementation was associated with a decreased frequency of type 1 diabetes when adjusted for neonatal, anthropometric, and social characteristics (rate ratio [RR] for regular \textit{vs} no supplementation 0·12, 95\% Cl 0·03–0·51, and irregular \textit{vs} no supplementation 0·16, 0·04–0·74. Children who regularly took the recommended dose of vitamin D (2000 IU daily) had a RR of 0·22 (0·05–0·89) compared with those who regularly received less than the recommended amount. Children suspected of having rickets during the first year of life had a RR of 3·0 (1·0–9·0) compared with those without such a suspicion.{\textless}/p{\textgreater}{\textless}h3{\textgreater}Interpretation{\textless}/h3{\textgreater}{\textless}p{\textgreater}Dietary vitamin D supplementation is associated with reduced risk of type 1 diabetes. Ensuring adequate vitamin D supplementation for infants could help to reverse the increasing trend in the incidence of type 1 diabetes.{\textless}/p{\textgreater}},
	language = {English},
	number = {9292},
	urldate = {2020-11-28},
	journal = {The Lancet},
	author = {Hyppönen, Elina and Läärä, Esa and Reunanen, Antti and Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta and Virtanen, Suvi M.},
	month = nov,
	year = {2001},
	pmid = {11705562},
	note = {Publisher: Elsevier},
	pages = {1500--1503}
}
Downloads: 0