Reducing the Risks Posed by Natural Hazards and Climate Change: The Need for a Participatory Dialogue between the Scientific Community and Policy Makers. Innocenti, D. & Albrito, P. 14(7):730–733.
Reducing the Risks Posed by Natural Hazards and Climate Change: The Need for a Participatory Dialogue between the Scientific Community and Policy Makers [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
In the last two decades we witnessed a progressive shift in the approach towards the reduction of the impact of natural hazards. From a general reactive approach, focusing on strengthening disaster response mechanisms, we have moved to proactive approaches. There has been recognition that each element of society, from public institutions to private sector, from community-based organizations to every single individual, can make a difference by acting before disasters strike to reduce the associated risks of human and economic losses. This proactive approach can be summarized in three words: Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR). Today, DRR is an approach used in several sectors and research areas. In the Development sphere, DRR is considered a key feature for sustainability of economic and development gains - especially for developing countries. Significantly, the United Nations Global Assessment Report on Disaster Risk Reduction (2009) is titled ” Risk and poverty in a changing climate” highlighting the importance of DRR in reducing poverty while being a means to address the challenges posed by adaptation to climate change. This paper, which serves as an introduction to the special issue of Environment Science & Policy on climate change impact on water-related disasters, intends to provide readers with an overview of the main policy frameworks addressing DRR internationally and in Europe. Further, it aims to offer some ” food for thought” on the underlying opportunities we have to enhance the resilience of our communities towards the risks posed by weather-related hazards. It stresses the importance of governance of risks, which starts from an effective dialogue between the scientific community and the policy makers: those who have the responsibility to decide on the most cost-effective interventions to address climate change adaptation and risk reduction.
@article{innocentiReducingRisksPosed2011,
  title = {Reducing the Risks Posed by Natural Hazards and Climate Change: The Need for a Participatory Dialogue between the Scientific Community and Policy Makers},
  author = {Innocenti, Demetrio and Albrito, Paola},
  date = {2011-11},
  journaltitle = {Environmental Science \& Policy},
  volume = {14},
  pages = {730--733},
  issn = {1462-9011},
  doi = {10.1016/j.envsci.2010.12.010},
  url = {https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envsci.2010.12.010},
  abstract = {In the last two decades we witnessed a progressive shift in the approach towards the reduction of the impact of natural hazards. From a general reactive approach, focusing on strengthening disaster response mechanisms, we have moved to proactive approaches. There has been recognition that each element of society, from public institutions to private sector, from community-based organizations to every single individual, can make a difference by acting before disasters strike to reduce the associated risks of human and economic losses. This proactive approach can be summarized in three words: Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR). Today, DRR is an approach used in several sectors and research areas. In the Development sphere, DRR is considered a key feature for sustainability of economic and development gains - especially for developing countries. Significantly, the United Nations Global Assessment Report on Disaster Risk Reduction (2009) is titled ” Risk and poverty in a changing climate” highlighting the importance of DRR in reducing poverty while being a means to address the challenges posed by adaptation to climate change. This paper, which serves as an introduction to the special issue of Environment Science \& Policy on climate change impact on water-related disasters, intends to provide readers with an overview of the main policy frameworks addressing DRR internationally and in Europe. Further, it aims to offer some ” food for thought” on the underlying opportunities we have to enhance the resilience of our communities towards the risks posed by weather-related hazards. It stresses the importance of governance of risks, which starts from an effective dialogue between the scientific community and the policy makers: those who have the responsibility to decide on the most cost-effective interventions to address climate change adaptation and risk reduction.},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-8753813,climate-change,disasters,ecosystem,environmental-policy,mitigation,participation,participatory-modelling,risk-assessment,science-policy-interface},
  number = {7}
}
Downloads: 0