Institutions and processes for scaling up renewables: Run-of-river hydropower in British Columbia. Jaccard, M., Melton, N., & Nyboer, J. Energy Policy.
Institutions and processes for scaling up renewables: Run-of-river hydropower in British Columbia [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
\textlessp\textgreater\textlessbr/\textgreaterThe dramatic scale-up of renewable energy over the coming decades is likely to pose significant challenges for coordinating land use allocation, environmental assessment, energy system planning and the design of greenhouse gas abatement policy. Of particular concern is the establishment of institutions and processes that enable consideration of multiple objectives and attributes, with adequate representation of affected interests, and without resulting in excessive delays in the development of renewable energy as part of a greenhouse gas abatement strategy. This paper uses the Canadian province of British Columbia as a case study for describing these challenges and the responses of policy makers seeking to rapidly scale-up renewables. Using evaluative criteria to assess this experience, we identify lessons that may be applicable to other jurisdictions seeking to quickly expand the production of renewable energy. These lessons include the design of institutions and processes that would likely be required in almost any jurisdiction with similar aims.\textless/p\textgreater
@article{jaccard_institutions_????,
	title = {Institutions and processes for scaling up renewables: {Run}-of-river hydropower in {British} {Columbia}},
	volume = {In Press, Corrected Proof},
	issn = {0301-4215},
	shorttitle = {Institutions and processes for scaling up renewables},
	url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6V2W-52BNJW9-4/2/34511e431d041df36e3a968e22d05afd},
	doi = {10.1016/j.enpol.2011.02.035},
	abstract = {{\textless}p{\textgreater}{\textless}br/{\textgreater}The dramatic scale-up of renewable energy over the coming decades is likely to pose significant challenges for coordinating land use allocation, environmental assessment, energy system planning and the design of greenhouse gas abatement policy. Of particular concern is the establishment of institutions and processes that enable consideration of multiple objectives and attributes, with adequate representation of affected interests, and without resulting in excessive delays in the development of renewable energy as part of a greenhouse gas abatement strategy. This paper uses the Canadian province of British Columbia as a case study for describing these challenges and the responses of policy makers seeking to rapidly scale-up renewables. Using evaluative criteria to assess this experience, we identify lessons that may be applicable to other jurisdictions seeking to quickly expand the production of renewable energy. These lessons include the design of institutions and processes that would likely be required in almost any jurisdiction with similar aims.{\textless}/p{\textgreater}},
	urldate = {2011-03-14},
	journal = {Energy Policy},
	author = {Jaccard, Mark and Melton, Noel and Nyboer, John},
	keywords = {Environmental impact, Evaluation criteria, renewable energy},
	file = {ScienceDirect Full Text PDF:files/22024/Jaccard et al. - Institutions and processes for scaling up renewabl.pdf:application/pdf}
}
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