Post-Fire Geomorphic Response in Steep, Forested Landscapes: Oregon Coast Range, USA. Jackson, M. & Roering, J. J. 28(11-12):1131–1146.
Post-Fire Geomorphic Response in Steep, Forested Landscapes: Oregon Coast Range, USA [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
The role of fire in shaping steep, forested landscapes depends on a suite of hydrologic, biologic, and geological characteristics, including the propensity for hydrophobic soil layers to promote runoff erosion during subsequent rainfall events. In the Oregon Coast Range, several studies postulate that fire primarily modulates sediment production via root reinforcement and shallow landslide susceptibility, although few studies have documented post-fire geomorphic response. Here, we describe field observations and topographic analyses for three sites in the central Oregon Coast Range that burned in 1999, 2002, and 2003. The fires generated strongly hydrophobic soil layers that did not promote runoff erosion because the continuity of the layers was interrupted by pervasive discontinuities that facilitated rapid infiltration. At each of our sites, fire generated significant colluvial transport via dry ravel, consistent with other field-based studies in the western United States. Fire-driven dry ravel accumulation in low-order valleys of our Sulphur Creek site equated to a slope-averaged landscape lowering of 2.5 mm. Given Holocene estimates of fire frequency, these results suggest that fire may contribute 10-20\,% of total denudation across steep, dissected portions of the Oregon Coast Range. In addition, we documented more rapid decline of root strength at our sites than has been observed after timber harvest, suggesting that root strength was compromised prior to fire or that intense heat damaged roots in the shallow subsurface. Given that fire frequencies in the Pacific Northwest are predicted to increase with continued climate change, our findings highlight the importance of fire-induced dry ravel and post-fire debris flow activity in controlling sediment delivery to channels.
@article{jacksonPostfireGeomorphicResponse2009,
  title = {Post-Fire Geomorphic Response in Steep, Forested Landscapes: {{Oregon Coast Range}}, {{USA}}},
  author = {Jackson, Molly and Roering, Joshua J.},
  date = {2009-06},
  journaltitle = {Quaternary Science Reviews},
  volume = {28},
  pages = {1131--1146},
  issn = {0277-3791},
  doi = {10.1016/j.quascirev.2008.05.003},
  url = {https://doi.org/10.1016/j.quascirev.2008.05.003},
  abstract = {The role of fire in shaping steep, forested landscapes depends on a suite of hydrologic, biologic, and geological characteristics, including the propensity for hydrophobic soil layers to promote runoff erosion during subsequent rainfall events. In the Oregon Coast Range, several studies postulate that fire primarily modulates sediment production via root reinforcement and shallow landslide susceptibility, although few studies have documented post-fire geomorphic response. Here, we describe field observations and topographic analyses for three sites in the central Oregon Coast Range that burned in 1999, 2002, and 2003. The fires generated strongly hydrophobic soil layers that did not promote runoff erosion because the continuity of the layers was interrupted by pervasive discontinuities that facilitated rapid infiltration. At each of our sites, fire generated significant colluvial transport via dry ravel, consistent with other field-based studies in the western United States. Fire-driven dry ravel accumulation in low-order valleys of our Sulphur Creek site equated to a slope-averaged landscape lowering of 2.5 mm. Given Holocene estimates of fire frequency, these results suggest that fire may contribute 10-20\,\% of total denudation across steep, dissected portions of the Oregon Coast Range. In addition, we documented more rapid decline of root strength at our sites than has been observed after timber harvest, suggesting that root strength was compromised prior to fire or that intense heat damaged roots in the shallow subsurface. Given that fire frequencies in the Pacific Northwest are predicted to increase with continued climate change, our findings highlight the importance of fire-induced dry ravel and post-fire debris flow activity in controlling sediment delivery to channels.},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-14110954,~to-add-doi-URL,burnt-area,debris-flows,forest-resources,geomorphology,landslides,mountainous-areas,postfire-impacts,soil-hydrophobicity,soil-resources,united-states,water-resources,wildfires},
  number = {11-12}
}
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