Policy Feedback and Policy Change. Jacobs, A. & Weaver, R. Technical Report ID 1642636, Social Science Research Network, Rochester, NY, July, 2010.
Policy Feedback and Policy Change [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
The concept of policy feedback has become central to the study of policymaking. This paper seeks to advance the analysis of policy feedback in four principal ways. First, we argue that, despite a strong emphasis in the literature positive feedback, negative feedback effects are likely to be highly common and to have important implications for policy development. Second, we call into question the common notion of positive feedback as primarily stability-inducing and negative feedback as a driver of change. Third, we highlight the important ways in which feedback mechanisms and their effects are conditional on other features of the political and social context. Fourth, we argue that explanations that integrate negative with positive feedback effects – and that understand those effects as conditional – can help to explain both incremental and dramatic policy change. We contend that both negative and positive feedback effects can - under particular political and technical conditions - explain the transformation of policy regimes.
@techreport{jacobs_policy_2010,
	address = {Rochester, NY},
	type = {{SSRN} {Scholarly} {Paper}},
	title = {Policy {Feedback} and {Policy} {Change}},
	url = {http://papers.ssrn.com/abstract=1642636},
	abstract = {The concept of policy feedback has become central to the study of policymaking. This paper seeks to advance the analysis of policy feedback in four principal ways. First, we argue that, despite a strong emphasis in the literature positive feedback, negative feedback effects are likely to be highly common and to have important implications for policy development. Second, we call into question the common notion of positive feedback as primarily stability-inducing and negative feedback as a driver of change. Third, we highlight the important ways in which feedback mechanisms and their effects are conditional on other features of the political and social context. Fourth, we argue that explanations that integrate negative with positive feedback effects – and that understand those effects as conditional – can help to explain both incremental and dramatic policy change. We contend that both negative and positive feedback effects can - under particular political and technical conditions - explain the transformation of policy regimes.},
	number = {ID 1642636},
	urldate = {2013-05-06},
	institution = {Social Science Research Network},
	author = {Jacobs, Alan and Weaver, R.},
	month = jul,
	year = {2010},
	keywords = {Health care, negative feedback, Path dependence, pensions, policy feedback, political institutions, positive feedback, Public policy}
}
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