Treasured genes in museum collections. Jaksch, K., Fehér, Z., Haring, E., & Eschner, A. In Munich, Germany, November, 2014.
abstract   bibtex   
Molecular genetic analyses has become vital in evolutionary biology studies and indispensable in many research projects. Optimally, fresh tissue is collected and analysed, but there are several reasons why it might be not possible to gain fresh material: for example, because the species is rare or extinct, difficult to find or no longer occurring in a particular area. Quite often inaccessibility of distribution areas due to political reasons can also hamper the collecting of specimens. In such cases museum collections are huge treasuries, as their collections of specimens also represent a large reservoir of genes. In the present study we tested the usage of museum material for DNA analyses in ethanol conserved molluscs as well as dried shells of snails. For the first task we analysed 72 glasses of the mollusc collection of the Natural History Museum Vienna, comprising 20 different taxa of 4 classes, which were tested with different extraction protocols and PCR primers. The collecting date of the chosen samples ranged from 1877 to 2002. Moreover, we successfully extracted DNA from the mummies that remain in an empty shell of a snail. For this purpose a good working protocol has been established. The dry shells used in these analyses were collected between 1972 and 2006. To test the outcome of the extraction, we amplified and sequenced two short sections of the mitochondrial genome (COI and 16S). In general, our survey of DNA extraction methods from old museum samples yielded very good results and even samples aged about 120 years contained DNA of sufficient quality to isolate the desired sequences. This investigation is a very important step to optimize approaches for DNA analyses of museum material.
@inproceedings{jaksch_treasured_2014,
	address = {Munich, Germany},
	title = {Treasured genes in museum collections},
	abstract = {Molecular genetic analyses has become vital in evolutionary biology studies and indispensable in many research projects. Optimally, fresh tissue is collected and analysed, but there are several reasons why it might be not possible to gain fresh material: for example, because the species is rare or extinct, difficult to find or no longer occurring in a particular area. Quite often inaccessibility of distribution areas due to political reasons can also hamper the collecting of specimens. In such cases museum collections are huge treasuries, as their collections of specimens also represent a large reservoir of genes. In the present study we tested the usage of museum material for DNA analyses in ethanol conserved molluscs as well as dried shells of snails. For the first task we analysed 72 glasses of the mollusc collection of the Natural History Museum Vienna, comprising 20 different taxa of 4 classes, which were tested with different extraction protocols and PCR primers. The collecting date of the chosen samples ranged from 1877 to 2002. Moreover, we successfully extracted DNA from the mummies that remain in an empty shell of a snail. For this purpose a good working protocol has been established. The dry shells used in these analyses were collected between 1972 and 2006. To test the outcome of the extraction, we amplified and sequenced two short sections of the mitochondrial genome (COI and 16S). In general, our survey of DNA extraction methods from old museum samples yielded very good results and even samples aged about 120 years contained DNA of sufficient quality to isolate the desired sequences. This investigation is a very important step to optimize approaches for DNA analyses of museum material.},
	language = {English},
	author = {Jaksch, Katharina and Fehér, Zoltán and Haring, Elisabeth and Eschner, Anita},
	month = nov,
	year = {2014},
}

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