Characteristics of Norway Spruce Trees (Picea Abies) Surviving a Spruce Bark Beetle (Ips Typographus L.) Outbreak. Jakuš, R., Edwards-Jonášová, M., Cudĺın, P., Blaženec, M., Jež́ık, M., Havĺıček, F., & Moravec, I. 25(6):965–973.
Characteristics of Norway Spruce Trees (Picea Abies) Surviving a Spruce Bark Beetle (Ips Typographus L.) Outbreak [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
The characteristics of spruce individuals, which survived a massive bark beetle outbreak, were compared with the characteristics of neighbouring attacked trees in Šumava National Park (Czech Republic). Selected parameters related to crown geometry, stand conditions and distances between trees were measured or estimated. Significant differences were found between the surviving trees and the neighbouring trees attacked by I. typographus. Trees with a higher level of stem shading (longer crown length) tended to survive. The attacked trees were usually located in areas with larger basal area, especially southwards from them. A shorter distance to a previously attacked tree increased the probability of additional attack. Spruce trees with more progressive crown structure transformation (primary structure defoliation) were significantly more frequently attacked by spruce bark beetle. Superior and taller trees had a clearly longer life expectancy than dominant ones. These results show that the attack of trees by bark beetle can be predicted to a certain degree, which can be used in management of endangered spruce forests. [Excerpt: Conclusions] Significant differences were found between surviving trees and neighbouring dead trees attacked by I. typographus. These differences were most pronounced in: [::(a)] Individual shading: trees with a higher level of individual shading (crown length) tended to survive. [::(b)] Collective shading: dead trees were usually located in areas with higher basal area, especially southwards from trees. [::(c)] Distance factors: a short distance to a previously attacked tree favoured attacks. [::(d)] Primary structure defoliation: spruce trees with higher crown structure transformation (larger primary structure defoliation) were significantly more frequently attacked by spruce bark beetle. [::(e)] Social status: superior trees had a higher chance to survive than dominant trees. [::(f)] These results show that the attack of trees by bark beetle can be predicted to a certain degree, which can be used in the management of endangered spruce forests. [] [...]
@article{jakusCharacteristicsNorwaySpruce2011,
  title = {Characteristics of {{Norway}} Spruce Trees ({{Picea}} Abies) Surviving a Spruce Bark Beetle ({{Ips}} Typographus {{L}}.) Outbreak},
  author = {Jakuš, R. and Edwards-Jonášová, M. and Cudĺın, P. and Blaženec, M. and Jež́ık, M. and Havĺıček, F. and Moravec, Ivo},
  date = {2011-05},
  journaltitle = {Trees - Structure and Function},
  volume = {25},
  pages = {965--973},
  issn = {0931-1890},
  doi = {10.1007/s00468-011-0571-9},
  url = {http://mfkp.org/INRMM/article/9435262},
  abstract = {The characteristics of spruce individuals, which survived a massive bark beetle outbreak, were compared with the characteristics of neighbouring attacked trees in Šumava National Park (Czech Republic). Selected parameters related to crown geometry, stand conditions and distances between trees were measured or estimated. Significant differences were found between the surviving trees and the neighbouring trees attacked by I. typographus. Trees with a higher level of stem shading (longer crown length) tended to survive. The attacked trees were usually located in areas with larger basal area, especially southwards from them. A shorter distance to a previously attacked tree increased the probability of additional attack. Spruce trees with more progressive crown structure transformation (primary structure defoliation) were significantly more frequently attacked by spruce bark beetle. Superior and taller trees had a clearly longer life expectancy than dominant ones. These results show that the attack of trees by bark beetle can be predicted to a certain degree, which can be used in management of endangered spruce forests.

[Excerpt: Conclusions] Significant differences were found between surviving trees and neighbouring dead trees attacked by I. typographus. These differences were most pronounced in: [::(a)] Individual shading: trees with a higher level of individual shading (crown length) tended to survive. [::(b)] Collective shading: dead trees were usually located in areas with higher basal area, especially southwards from trees. [::(c)] Distance factors: a short distance to a previously attacked tree favoured attacks. [::(d)] Primary structure defoliation: spruce trees with higher crown structure transformation (larger primary structure defoliation) were significantly more frequently attacked by spruce bark beetle. [::(e)] Social status: superior trees had a higher chance to survive than dominant trees. [::(f)] These results show that the attack of trees by bark beetle can be predicted to a certain degree, which can be used in the management of endangered spruce forests. [] [...]},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-9435262,~to-add-doi-URL,bark-beetle,czech-republic,forest-management,forest-pests,forest-resources,ips-typographus,outbreaks,picea-abies,solar-radiation,topography,tree-mortality},
  number = {6}
}
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