Spaces of Lay-Religious Interaction in Cistercian Houses of Northern Europe. Jamroziak, E. Parergon, 27(2):37–58, 2010. \textlessp\textgreaterVolume 27, Number 2, 2010\textless/p\textgreater
Spaces of Lay-Religious Interaction in Cistercian Houses of Northern Europe [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
AbstractMedieval Cistercian communities are commonly perceived to be far more restrictive in allowing lay people access to the cloistral parts of their monasteries than the Benedictines, but the examples from different parts of Northern Europe (Scotland, Northern England, and Southern Baltic) show that the white monks were flexible in interpreting the order's regulations and customs. Lay people were admitted, particularly for ceremonies such as donations, but also occasionally for liturgy and meetings. Hospitality was very important in maintaining good relations with a variety of significant lay people. The lay burials in the Cistercian houses, which became increasingly common in the Cistercian churches and chapter houses from the thirteenth century onwards, were particularly valued for their eschatological powers.
@article{jamroziak_spaces_2010,
	title = {Spaces of {Lay}-{Religious} {Interaction} in {Cistercian} {Houses} of {Northern} {Europe}},
	volume = {27},
	issn = {1832-8334},
	url = {http://muse.jhu.edu.proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/journals/parergon/v027/27.2.jamroziak.html},
	abstract = {AbstractMedieval Cistercian communities are commonly perceived to be far more restrictive in allowing lay people access to the cloistral parts of their monasteries than the Benedictines, but the examples from different parts of Northern Europe (Scotland, Northern England, and Southern Baltic) show that the white monks were flexible in interpreting the order's regulations and customs. Lay people were admitted, particularly for ceremonies such as donations, but also occasionally for liturgy and meetings. Hospitality was very important in maintaining good relations with a variety of significant lay people. The lay burials in the Cistercian houses, which became increasingly common in the Cistercian churches and chapter houses from the thirteenth century onwards, were particularly valued for their eschatological powers.},
	number = {2},
	urldate = {2014-05-21TZ},
	journal = {Parergon},
	author = {Jamroziak, Emilia},
	year = {2010},
	note = {{\textless}p{\textgreater}Volume 27, Number 2, 2010{\textless}/p{\textgreater}},
	pages = {37--58}
}
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