Life-history trade-offs under different larval diets in Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae). Jaramillo, S. L., Mehlferber, E., & Moore, P. J. Physiological Entomology, 40(1):2–9, March, 2015. WOS:000349993900002
Life-history trade-offs under different larval diets in Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae) [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Most larval drosophilids eat the microorganisms that develop in rotting fruit, a relatively protein-rich resource. By contrast, the spotted-wing Drosophila suzukii Matsumara (Diptera: Drosophilidae) uniquely develops in ripening fruit, a protein-poor, carbohydrate-rich resource. This shift in larval nutritional niche has led to D. suzukii being a significant agricultural pest in the U.S.A. and Europe. Although occupying a new niche may benefit a species by reducing competition, adaptation in host use may generate trade-offs affecting fitness. To test the hypothesis that fitness trade-offs will change with adaptation to novel larval diets, D. suzukii larval development on either a diet of a fresh, ripe blueberry (a natural host) or standard artificial Drosophila media (protein-rich) is compared and the effect of diet on development time from egg to adult, adult body size and male wing spot area, and female fecundity is assessed. Larval development time differs, with larvae on the blueberry emerging as adults earlier than those on the artificial medium, although other fitness measures do not vary between the two diets. In addition, the faster development time on a blueberry does not trade off with body size as expected, although early fecundity is delayed in females that develop on blueberries. Thus, adaptation to a novel larval diet environment does not come at a cost to the ability to develop in protein-rich resources.
@article{jaramillo_life-history_2015,
	title = {Life-history trade-offs under different larval diets in {Drosophila} suzukii ({Diptera}: {Drosophilidae})},
	volume = {40},
	copyright = {All rights reserved},
	issn = {0307-6962},
	url = {https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/phen.12082},
	doi = {10.1111/phen.12082},
	abstract = {Most larval drosophilids eat the microorganisms that develop in rotting fruit, a relatively protein-rich resource. By contrast, the spotted-wing Drosophila suzukii Matsumara (Diptera: Drosophilidae) uniquely develops in ripening fruit, a protein-poor, carbohydrate-rich resource. This shift in larval nutritional niche has led to D. suzukii being a significant agricultural pest in the U.S.A. and Europe. Although occupying a new niche may benefit a species by reducing competition, adaptation in host use may generate trade-offs affecting fitness. To test the hypothesis that fitness trade-offs will change with adaptation to novel larval diets, D. suzukii larval development on either a diet of a fresh, ripe blueberry (a natural host) or standard artificial Drosophila media (protein-rich) is compared and the effect of diet on development time from egg to adult, adult body size and male wing spot area, and female fecundity is assessed. Larval development time differs, with larvae on the blueberry emerging as adults earlier than those on the artificial medium, although other fitness measures do not vary between the two diets. In addition, the faster development time on a blueberry does not trade off with body size as expected, although early fecundity is delayed in females that develop on blueberries. Thus, adaptation to a novel larval diet environment does not come at a cost to the ability to develop in protein-rich resources.},
	language = {English},
	number = {1},
	journal = {Physiological Entomology},
	author = {Jaramillo, Sandra L. and Mehlferber, Eli and Moore, Patricia J.},
	month = mar,
	year = {2015},
	note = {WOS:000349993900002},
	keywords = {Development time, Drosophila suzukii, larval diet, life-history trade-offs},
	pages = {2--9},
}

Downloads: 0