Lime (Tilia Spp.). Jensen, J. & Canger, S. In Turok, J., Jensen, J., Palmberg-Lerche, C., Rusanen, M., Russel, K., de Vries, S., & Lipman, E., editors, Noble Hardwoods Network: Report of the Third Meeting, 13-16 June 1998, Sagadi, Estonia, pages 28–38. Bioversity International.
Lime (Tilia Spp.) [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
Introduction: Owing to their aesthetic and cultural value as urban trees and as landscape elements, lime trees have become increasingly important in Europe in recent decades. For various reasons, the distribution of Tilia in Europe has declined over the last 2000 years. Unless protective measures are taken, the size and constitution of genetic variation of the Tilia species which occur in Europe will be significantly reduced. There is a need for a coordinated effort to secure the genetic resources of Tilia in Europe. A coordinated effort can reduce the conservation costs and improve the quality of the conservation activities. A gene resource conservation strategy for a particular species must be based on the available knowledge about the biology of the species and on the basic theories regarding ecology and population genetics. An approach for gene conservation of the species is outlined, based on an overview of the existing knowledge concerning the geographic distribution, biology and genetic diversity of Tilia in Europe, and on widely accepted measures for conservation of forest genetic resources. The approach described should be regarded as the minimum necessary effort required in a European context. Tilia cordata is considered the most important European lime species. In this paper Tilia refers primarily to T. cordata except when other species are mentioned. Tilia cordata has been subject to many more descriptions and investigations than T. platyphyllos, but since the biology and morphology of the two species are similar, information concerning the biology of T. cordata can in many cases be applied to T. platyphyllos.
@incollection{jensenLimeTiliaSpp1998,
  title = {Lime ({{Tilia}} Spp.)},
  booktitle = {Noble {{Hardwoods Network}}: {{Report}} of the {{Third Meeting}}, 13-16 {{June}} 1998, {{Sagadi}}, {{Estonia}}},
  author = {Jensen, J. and Canger, S.},
  editor = {Turok, J. and Jensen, J. and Palmberg-Lerche, Ch and Rusanen, M. and Russel, K. and de Vries, S. and Lipman, E.},
  date = {1998},
  pages = {28--38},
  publisher = {{Bioversity International}},
  url = {http://mfkp.org/INRMM/article/13578676},
  abstract = {Introduction: Owing to their aesthetic and cultural value as urban trees and as landscape elements, lime trees have become increasingly important in Europe in recent decades. For various reasons, the distribution of Tilia in Europe has declined over the last 2000 years. Unless protective measures are taken, the size and constitution of genetic variation of the Tilia species which occur in Europe will be significantly reduced. There is a need for a coordinated effort to secure the genetic resources of Tilia in Europe. A coordinated effort can reduce the conservation costs and improve the quality of the conservation activities. A gene resource conservation strategy for a particular species must be based on the available knowledge about the biology of the species and on the basic theories regarding ecology and population genetics. An approach for gene conservation of the species is outlined, based on an overview of the existing knowledge concerning the geographic distribution, biology and genetic diversity of Tilia in Europe, and on widely accepted measures for conservation of forest genetic resources. The approach described should be regarded as the minimum necessary effort required in a European context. Tilia cordata is considered the most important European lime species. In this paper Tilia refers primarily to T. cordata except when other species are mentioned. Tilia cordata has been subject to many more descriptions and investigations than T. platyphyllos, but since the biology and morphology of the two species are similar, information concerning the biology of T. cordata can in many cases be applied to T. platyphyllos.},
  isbn = {92-9043-403-1},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-13578676,conservation-strategies,genetic-resources,tilia-spp},
  options = {useprefix=true}
}
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