Cinchona Pubescens. Jäger, H. In Roloff, A., Weisgerber, H., Lang, U. M., Stimm, B., & Schütt, P., editors, Enzyklopädie Der Holzgewächse: Handbuch Und Atlas Der Dendrologie. Wiley-Vch Verlag.
Cinchona Pubescens [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
Cinchona is the most commercially important genus of the family Rubiaceae (coffee family) after the genus Coffea, which produces the coffee of commerce. The genus Cinchona comprises 23 species of tropical evergreen trees and shrubs, which are distributed from Costa Rica to Bolivia. C. pubescens grows at altitudes between 300 and 3300 m. It is a tree with broad leaves and white or pink fragrant flowers arranged in clusters. C. pubescens has been cultivated in several tropical regions of the world for its quinine-containing bark and roots. Quinine was used as a remedy to treat malaria and therefore had significant economic importance from the 17th to the beginning of the 20th century. In 1944, quinine was synthesized and therefore C. pubescens lost much of its importance, but natural quinine is still used both where the synthetic is not available and for other medicinal purposes. The genus Cinchona was named after the COUNTESS OF CHINCHÓN, wife of the Viceroy of Peru, by the Swedish botanist LINNAEUS in 1742. According to the well cited legend, the countess was cured of malaria by having been administered the bark of Cinchona in 1638 after all other remedies failed. Although this story is not true, Cinchona ever since was frequently used as a malaria remedy, especially distributed by the Jesuits in their world travels. Cinchona is the national tree of Ecuador and is on the coat of arms of Peru.
@incollection{jagerCinchonaPubescens2011,
  title = {Cinchona Pubescens},
  booktitle = {Enzyklopädie Der {{Holzgewächse}}: {{Handbuch}} Und {{Atlas}} Der {{Dendrologie}}},
  author = {Jäger, H.},
  editor = {Roloff, Andreas and Weisgerber, Horst and Lang, Ulla M. and Stimm, Bernd and Schütt, Peter},
  date = {2011},
  publisher = {{Wiley-Vch Verlag}},
  location = {{Weinheim}},
  url = {http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/9783527678518.ehg2011010/abstract},
  abstract = {Cinchona is the most commercially important genus of the family Rubiaceae (coffee family) after the genus Coffea, which produces the coffee of commerce. The genus Cinchona comprises 23 species of tropical evergreen trees and shrubs, which are distributed from Costa Rica to Bolivia. C. pubescens grows at altitudes between 300 and 3300 m. It is a tree with broad leaves and white or pink fragrant flowers arranged in clusters. C. pubescens has been cultivated in several tropical regions of the world for its quinine-containing bark and roots. Quinine was used as a remedy to treat malaria and therefore had significant economic importance from the 17th to the beginning of the 20th century. In 1944, quinine was synthesized and therefore C. pubescens lost much of its importance, but natural quinine is still used both where the synthetic is not available and for other medicinal purposes. The genus Cinchona was named after the COUNTESS OF CHINCHÓN, wife of the Viceroy of Peru, by the Swedish botanist LINNAEUS in 1742. According to the well cited legend, the countess was cured of malaria by having been administered the bark of Cinchona in 1638 after all other remedies failed. Although this story is not true, Cinchona ever since was frequently used as a malaria remedy, especially distributed by the Jesuits in their world travels. Cinchona is the national tree of Ecuador and is on the coat of arms of Peru.},
  isbn = {978-3-527-67851-8},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-13745712,cinchona-pubescens,enzykl-holzgew-handb-atlas-dendrol,forest-resources,monography,species-description}
}
Downloads: 0