Pelagic community respiration on the continental shelf off Georgia, USA. Jiang, L., Cai, W., Wang, Y., Diaz, J., Yager, P., & Hu, X. Biogeochemistry, 2010.
Pelagic community respiration on the continental shelf off Georgia, USA [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
The South Atlantic Bight (SAB) has been a focus for the study of continental shelf ecosystem respiration during the past two decades. However, two questions concerning respiration in this area have yet to be answered. First, why do previous estimates of respiration in the SAB exceed measured carbon fixation rates by almost an order of magnitude? Second, considering that bacteria are responsible for most of the pelagic community respiration in the SAB, why is respiration almost uniform from the coastline to the shelf break, while bacterial production estimates decrease offshore? This study addresses these critical questions by presenting new pelagic community respiration data that were collected across the entire width of the continental shelf off Georgia, USA from June 2003 to May 2006. The respiration was calculated as in vitro changes of dissolved oxygen and dissolved inorganic carbon concentrations during deck incubations. The measured respiration rates ranged from 0.3(
@article{jiang_pelagic_2010,
	title = {Pelagic community respiration on the continental shelf off {Georgia}, {USA}},
	volume = {98},
	url = {http://www.springerlink.com/content/n6684pw510j4627p/},
	abstract = {The South Atlantic Bight (SAB) has been a focus for the study of continental shelf ecosystem respiration during the past two decades. However, two questions concerning respiration in this area have yet to be answered. First, why do previous estimates of respiration in the SAB exceed measured carbon fixation rates by almost an order of magnitude? Second, considering that bacteria are responsible for most of the pelagic community respiration in the SAB, why is respiration almost uniform from the coastline to the shelf break, while bacterial production estimates decrease offshore? This study addresses these critical questions by presenting new pelagic community respiration data that were collected across the entire width of the continental shelf off Georgia, USA from June 2003 to May 2006. The respiration was calculated as in vitro changes of dissolved oxygen and dissolved inorganic carbon concentrations during deck incubations. The measured respiration rates ranged from 0.3(},
	journal = {Biogeochemistry},
	author = {Jiang, Liqing. and Cai, Wei-Jun. and Wang, Yongchen. and Diaz, J. and Yager, Patricia. and Hu, Xinping.},
	year = {2010},
	keywords = {GCE, CO2, respiration, metabolism, oceanography}
}
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