Effects of multiple use on peak flows and low flows. Johnson, E. A. 1965.
Effects of multiple use on peak flows and low flows [pdf]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
Forest lands are valuable for the wood, livestock, recreation and wildlife, as well as the water they produce. Land use significantly affects maximum discharges from small forest and range watersheds. Restoring plant cover on misused land of small watersheds can alter the crests of small peak discharges. Clear cutting of hardwood forests has not significantly increased streamflow peaks. Clear cutting coniferous forests in the western United States influences storm peaks of snow-fed streams. It is important to understand the effects of such land uses as expressways, roads, and properly managed mining, grazing, wildlife, and recreation upon rates of storm peak discharge. Where the objective is to hold down maximum flood discharge, seven areas of research are recommended where more activity is needed. Water demands of forest and range areas can draw heavily on ground- and soil-water supplies, the source of streamflow during dry seasons. Clear cutting hardwood forests in the southern Appalachian Mountains increased low flows of streams appreciably. Conversely, there was an evident decrease in low flows after pines were planted on a small Ohio watershed. Where water is limited, we need more facts on the water-disposal process associated with such land uses as mining, grazing, wildlife, and growing timber. Where the objective is to increase low flows, five areas of investigation are recommended where there is need for more research.
@article{johnson_effects_1965,
	title = {Effects of multiple use on peak flows and low flows},
	url = {http://cwt33.ecology.uga.edu/publications/2174.pdf},
	abstract = {Forest lands are valuable for the wood, livestock, recreation and wildlife, as well as the water they produce. Land use significantly affects maximum discharges from small forest and range watersheds. Restoring plant cover on misused land of small watersheds can alter the crests of small peak discharges. Clear cutting of hardwood forests has not significantly increased streamflow peaks. Clear cutting coniferous forests in the western United States influences storm peaks of snow-fed streams. It is important to understand the effects of such land uses as expressways, roads, and properly managed mining, grazing, wildlife, and recreation upon rates of storm peak discharge. Where the objective is to hold down maximum flood discharge, seven areas of research are recommended where more activity is needed. Water demands of forest and range areas can draw heavily on ground- and soil-water supplies, the source of streamflow during dry seasons. Clear cutting hardwood forests in the southern Appalachian Mountains increased low flows of streams appreciably. Conversely, there was an evident decrease in low flows after pines were planted on a small Ohio watershed. Where water is limited, we need more facts on the water-disposal process associated with such land uses as mining, grazing, wildlife, and growing timber. Where the objective is to increase low flows, five areas of investigation are recommended where there is need for more research.},
	author = {Johnson, E. A.},
	year = {1965},
	keywords = {CWT}
}
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