Quercus L. Jones, E. W. 47(1):169–222.
abstract   bibtex   
A large genus of shrubs and trees of at least 450 species, many of which are major components of the communities in which they occur. Distributed throughout the temperate regions of the northern hemisphere and extending into the tropical montane forest of central America southwards to Colombia, and that of lndomalaya; in Africa only in the Mediterranean Basin. Most of the species are restricted to the warmer temperate regions. The most recent monographs of the genus are by Camus (1936-39) and Schwarz (1936-39, European spp.); Camus's monograph gives much general information in addition to the systematic treatment. The two species indigenous to Britain, Q. robur L. and Q. petraea Liebl., are both representative of the section Lepidobalanus Endl., to which Q. ilex L., which is locally naturalized in the south of England, also belongs. This section also includes most of the remaining deciduous species of Europe and the western Mediterranean Basin, and also the American 'White Oaks'. Q. cerris L., which is completely naturalized in many parts of England and Wales, is a representative of the section Cerris Spach, to which belong the Mediterranean Q. suber L. and Q. coccifera L., together with many eastern Mediterranean and Asian species. The widely cultivated Q. borealis Mich. is a representative of the exclusively American section Erythrobalanus (the 'Red Oaks'); this species also frequently regenerates naturally in our woodlands where it has been planted, and is naturalized in some parts of the Continent.
@article{jonesQuercus1959,
  title = {Quercus {{L}}.},
  author = {Jones, Eustace W.},
  date = {1959},
  journaltitle = {Journal of Ecology},
  volume = {47},
  pages = {169--222},
  abstract = {A large genus of shrubs and trees of at least 450 species, many of which are major components of the communities in which they occur. Distributed throughout the temperate regions of the northern hemisphere and extending into the tropical montane forest of central America southwards to Colombia, and that of lndomalaya; in Africa only in the Mediterranean Basin. Most of the species are restricted to the warmer temperate regions. The most recent monographs of the genus are by Camus (1936-39) and Schwarz (1936-39, European spp.); Camus's monograph gives much general information in addition to the systematic treatment. The two species indigenous to Britain, Q. robur L. and Q. petraea Liebl., are both representative of the section Lepidobalanus Endl., to which Q. ilex L., which is locally naturalized in the south of England, also belongs. This section also includes most of the remaining deciduous species of Europe and the western Mediterranean Basin, and also the American 'White Oaks'. Q. cerris L., which is completely naturalized in many parts of England and Wales, is a representative of the section Cerris Spach, to which belong the Mediterranean Q. suber L. and Q. coccifera L., together with many eastern Mediterranean and Asian species. The widely cultivated Q. borealis Mich. is a representative of the exclusively American section Erythrobalanus (the 'Red Oaks'); this species also frequently regenerates naturally in our woodlands where it has been planted, and is naturalized in some parts of the Continent.},
  eprint = {2257253},
  eprinttype = {jstor},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-13509281,monography,quercus-cerris,quercus-ilex,quercus-petraea,quercus-robur,quercus-spp},
  number = {1}
}
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