A five-year study of on-campus Internet use by undergraduate biomedical students. Judd, T. & Kennedy, G. Computers and Education, 55(4):1564–1571, 2010.
A five-year study of on-campus Internet use by undergraduate biomedical students [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
This paper reports on a five-year study (2005-2009) of biomedical students' on-campus use of the Internet. Internet usage logs were used to investigate students' sessional use of key websites and technologies. The most frequented sites and technologies included the university's learning management system, Google, email and Facebook. Email was the primary method of electronic communication. However, its use declined over time, with a steep drop in use during 2006 and 2007 appearing to correspond with the rapid uptake of the social networking site Facebook. Both Google and Wikipedia gained in popularity over time while the use of other key information sources, including the library and biomedical portals, remained low throughout the study. With the notable exception of Facebook, most 'Web 2.0' technologies attracted little use. The 'Net Generation' students involved in this study were heavy users of generalist information retrieval tools and key online university services, and prefered to use externally hosted tools for online communication. These and other findings have important implications for the selection and provision of services by universities. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
@article{judd_five-year_2010,
	title = {A five-year study of on-campus {Internet} use by undergraduate biomedical students},
	volume = {55},
	issn = {03601315},
	url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2010.06.022},
	doi = {10.1016/j.compedu.2010.06.022},
	abstract = {This paper reports on a five-year study (2005-2009) of biomedical students' on-campus use of the Internet. Internet usage logs were used to investigate students' sessional use of key websites and technologies. The most frequented sites and technologies included the university's learning management system, Google, email and Facebook. Email was the primary method of electronic communication. However, its use declined over time, with a steep drop in use during 2006 and 2007 appearing to correspond with the rapid uptake of the social networking site Facebook. Both Google and Wikipedia gained in popularity over time while the use of other key information sources, including the library and biomedical portals, remained low throughout the study. With the notable exception of Facebook, most 'Web 2.0' technologies attracted little use. The 'Net Generation' students involved in this study were heavy users of generalist information retrieval tools and key online university services, and prefered to use externally hosted tools for online communication. These and other findings have important implications for the selection and provision of services by universities. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.},
	number = {4},
	journal = {Computers and Education},
	author = {Judd, Terry and Kennedy, Gregor},
	year = {2010},
	keywords = {Computer-mediated communication, Media in education, Teaching/learning strategies},
	pages = {1564--1571}
}
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