Embedded expertise: a conceptual framework for reconstructing knowledge orders, their transformation and local specificities. Jung, A., Korinek, R., & Straßheim, H. Innovation: The European Journal of Social Science Research, 0(0):1--22.
Embedded expertise: a conceptual framework for reconstructing knowledge orders, their transformation and local specificities [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
The role of science in modern democracies has long been a topic of heated debate. Recent scholarship has increasingly focused on the social construction of the science–policy–politics nexus. For understanding both the local specificity of concrete configurations and general trends much is to be gained from an analytical framework. In a first introductory section we describe already existing categorizations and typologies, identifying a research gap: a framework for reconstructing the discursive forces shaping the science–policy–politics interface based on both mutually exclusive and exhaustive categories. Our answer is the concept of knowledge orders. Building on already existing scholarship in this field, we define knowledge orders as discursive orders structuring the production of expertise. We distinguish between three levels of knowledge orders: the generation and communication of science-based expertise, the regulation of these processes, and reflexive discourses in which the epistemic authority and the political relevance of science-based expertise are (de)legitimized and renegotiated and the regulation of the science–policy–politics nexus debated. Each level can be analyzed in terms of the criteria based on which competence is attributed (social dimension) and at when political or scientific criteria of relevance and validity are to be applied (procedural dimension). The framework is illustrated by referring to both well-known examples in science studies and our own research on science–policy–politics arrangements in the field of food safety and employment policy.
@article{jung_embedded_????,
	title = {Embedded expertise: a conceptual framework for reconstructing knowledge orders, their transformation and local specificities},
	volume = {0},
	issn = {1351-1610},
	shorttitle = {Embedded expertise},
	url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13511610.2014.892425},
	doi = {10.1080/13511610.2014.892425},
	abstract = {The role of science in modern democracies has long been a topic of heated debate. Recent scholarship has increasingly focused on the social construction of the science–policy–politics nexus. For understanding both the local specificity of concrete configurations and general trends much is to be gained from an analytical framework. In a first introductory section we describe already existing categorizations and typologies, identifying a research gap: a framework for reconstructing the discursive forces shaping the science–policy–politics interface based on both mutually exclusive and exhaustive categories. Our answer is the concept of knowledge orders. Building on already existing scholarship in this field, we define knowledge orders as discursive orders structuring the production of expertise. We distinguish between three levels of knowledge orders: the generation and communication of science-based expertise, the regulation of these processes, and reflexive discourses in which the epistemic authority and the political relevance of science-based expertise are (de)legitimized and renegotiated and the regulation of the science–policy–politics nexus debated. Each level can be analyzed in terms of the criteria based on which competence is attributed (social dimension) and at when political or scientific criteria of relevance and validity are to be applied (procedural dimension). The framework is illustrated by referring to both well-known examples in science studies and our own research on science–policy–politics arrangements in the field of food safety and employment policy.},
	number = {0},
	urldate = {2014-04-15},
	journal = {Innovation: The European Journal of Social Science Research},
	author = {Jung, Arlena and Korinek, Rebecca-Lea and Straßheim, Holger},
	pages = {1--22},
	file = {Snapshot:files/48900/13511610.2014.html:text/html}
}
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