Autistic Architecture: The Fall of the Icon and the Rise of the Serial Object of Architecture , Autistic Architecture: The Fall of the Icon and the Rise of the Serial Object of Architecture. Kaika, M. 29(6):968–992.
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In this contribution I sketch a framework for interpreting the parallel process of banalisation of old and proliferation of new ‘iconic’ corporate architecture as the Janus-faced manifestation of a qualitative shift in the relationship between capital and architecture. Highlighting the change from place-bound, place-loyal urban elites to footloose transnational elites, I argue that after the 1970s the need to develop a new set of building specifications and use values to accommodate the requirements of a new urban economy was matched by an equally pressing need to institute a new set of symbolic values for a new generation of elites. Drawing upon Castoriadis's work, I conceptualise architecture as the narrativisation of the desires of elites during a given era, and as a key component in instituting a society's radical imaginary during moments of change. Within this framework, I argue that despite their common commitment to spectacular design, there are a number of significant differences between contemporary and earlier corporate ‘icons’. Discerning the distinct symbolic, material, and social role of contemporary corporate buildings, I challenge their identification as ‘iconic’ architecture and place them instead under a new category, which I term ‘autistic architecture’., In this contribution I sketch a framework for interpreting the parallel process of banalisation of old and proliferation of new ‘iconic’ corporate architecture as the Janus-faced manifestation of a qualitative shift in the relationship between capital and architecture. Highlighting the change from place-bound, place-loyal urban elites to footloose transnational elites, I argue that after the 1970s the need to develop a new set of building specifications and use values to accommodate the requirements of a new urban economy was matched by an equally pressing need to institute a new set of symbolic values for a new generation of elites. Drawing upon Castoriadis's work, I conceptualise architecture as the narrativisation of the desires of elites during a given era, and as a key component in instituting a society's radical imaginary during moments of change. Within this framework, I argue that despite their common commitment to spectacular design, there are a number of significant differences between contemporary and earlier corporate ‘icons’. Discerning the distinct symbolic, material, and social role of contemporary corporate buildings, I challenge their identification as ‘iconic’ architecture and place them instead under a new category, which I term ‘autistic architecture’.
@article{kaika_autistic_2011,
	title = {Autistic Architecture: The Fall of the Icon and the Rise of the Serial Object of Architecture                                                    ,                                                             Autistic Architecture: The Fall of the Icon and the Rise of the Serial Object of Architecture},
	volume = {29},
	issn = {0263-7758},
	doi = {10.1068/d16110},
	shorttitle = {Autistic Architecture},
	abstract = {In this contribution I sketch a framework for interpreting the parallel process of banalisation of old and proliferation of new ‘iconic’ corporate architecture as the Janus-faced manifestation of a qualitative shift in the relationship between capital and architecture. Highlighting the change from place-bound, place-loyal urban elites to footloose transnational elites, I argue that after the 1970s the need to develop a new set of building specifications and use values to accommodate the requirements of a new urban economy was matched by an equally pressing need to institute a new set of symbolic values for a new generation of elites. Drawing upon Castoriadis's work, I conceptualise architecture as the narrativisation of the desires of elites during a given era, and as a key component in instituting a society's radical imaginary during moments of change. Within this framework, I argue that despite their common commitment to spectacular design, there are a number of significant differences between contemporary and earlier corporate ‘icons’. Discerning the distinct symbolic, material, and social role of contemporary corporate buildings, I challenge their identification as ‘iconic’ architecture and place them instead under a new category, which I term ‘autistic architecture’., In this contribution I sketch a framework for interpreting the parallel process of banalisation of old and proliferation of new ‘iconic’ corporate architecture as the Janus-faced manifestation of a qualitative shift in the relationship between capital and architecture. Highlighting the change from place-bound, place-loyal urban elites to footloose transnational elites, I argue that after the 1970s the need to develop a new set of building specifications and use values to accommodate the requirements of a new urban economy was matched by an equally pressing need to institute a new set of symbolic values for a new generation of elites. Drawing upon Castoriadis's work, I conceptualise architecture as the narrativisation of the desires of elites during a given era, and as a key component in instituting a society's radical imaginary during moments of change. Within this framework, I argue that despite their common commitment to spectacular design, there are a number of significant differences between contemporary and earlier corporate ‘icons’. Discerning the distinct symbolic, material, and social role of contemporary corporate buildings, I challenge their identification as ‘iconic’ architecture and place them instead under a new category, which I term ‘autistic architecture’.},
	pages = {968--992},
	number = {6},
	journaltitle = {Environment and Planning D: Society and Space},
	shortjournal = {Environ Plan D},
	author = {Kaika, Maria},
	date = {2011-12-01},
	langid = {english},
	file = {Inskickad version:/Users/faktisktmuratsdator/Zotero/storage/EF3KEJU7/Kaika - 2011 - Autistic Architecture The Fall of the Icon and th.pdf:application/pdf}
}
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