Parental Influences on the Educational Outcomes of Immigrant Youth. Kao, G. International Migration Review, 38(2(146)):427--449, 2004.
abstract   bibtex   
Recent research suggests that children with immigrant parents tend to outperform their counterparts with native-born parents. This article examines whether the relative advantage of children of immigrants can be traced to differences in the character of parent-child relationships. Using the National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988 (NELS), I examine whether parent-child interaction varies among racial & generational groups. Descriptive tabulations suggest that immigrant parents are less likely to share decision-making power & to talk about school in general than are native-born parents. However, immigrant parents are more likely to talk about college, & their children report that they are closer to their parents than youth of native-born parents. While differences in parent-child interaction account for some of the differences in educational achievement between racial & generational groups, significant variation by race & generational status remains. Finally, I found significant variation between parenting behavior & its impact on GPA by race & ethnicity. 5 Tables, 1 Figure, 31 References. Adapted from the source document.
@article{kao_parental_2004,
	title = {Parental {Influences} on the {Educational} {Outcomes} of {Immigrant} {Youth}},
	volume = {38},
	abstract = {Recent research suggests that children with immigrant parents tend to outperform their counterparts with native-born parents. This article examines whether the relative advantage of children of immigrants can be traced to differences in the character of parent-child relationships. Using the National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988 (NELS), I examine whether parent-child interaction varies among racial \& generational groups. Descriptive tabulations suggest that immigrant parents are less likely to share decision-making power \& to talk about school in general than are native-born parents. However, immigrant parents are more likely to talk about college, \& their children report that they are closer to their parents than youth of native-born parents. While differences in parent-child interaction account for some of the differences in educational achievement between racial \& generational groups, significant variation by race \& generational status remains. Finally, I found significant variation between parenting behavior \& its impact on GPA by race \& ethnicity. 5 Tables, 1 Figure, 31 References. Adapted from the source document.},
	number = {2(146)},
	journal = {International Migration Review},
	author = {Kao, Grace},
	year = {2004},
	keywords = {IMMIGRANTS, academic achievement, childrearing, generational differences, grades (scholastic), parent child relations, parental influence, racial differences},
	pages = {427--449}
}
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