Antichaos and Adaptation. Kauffman, S. A. 265(2):78–84.
Antichaos and Adaptation [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Mathematical discoveries are inviting changes in biologists' thinking about the origins of order in evolution. All living things are highly ordered systems: they have intricate structures that are maintained and even duplicated through a precise ballet of chemical and behavioral activities. Since Darwin, biologists have seen natural selection as virtually the sole source of that order. But Darwin could not have suspected the existence of self-orgardzation, a recently discovered, innate property of some complex systems. It is possible that biological order reflects in part a spontaneous order on which selection has acted. Selection has molded, but was not compelled to invent, the native coherence of ontogeny, or biological development. Indeed, the capacity to evolve and adapt may itself be an achievement of evolution. The studies supporting these conclusions remain tentative and incomplete. Nevertheless, on the basis of mathematical models for biological systems that exhibit self-orgardzation, one can make predictions that are consistent with the observed properties of organisms. We may have begun to understand evolution as the marriage of selection and self-orgardzation. [...]
@article{kauffmanAntichaosAdaptation1991,
  title = {Antichaos and {{Adaptation}}},
  author = {Kauffman, Stuart A.},
  date = {1991},
  journaltitle = {Scientific American},
  volume = {265},
  pages = {78--84},
  doi = {10.1038/scientificamerican0891-78},
  url = {https://doi.org/10.1038/scientificamerican0891-78},
  abstract = {Mathematical discoveries are inviting changes in biologists' thinking about the origins of order in evolution. All living things are highly ordered systems: they have intricate structures that are maintained and even duplicated through a precise ballet of chemical and behavioral activities. Since Darwin, biologists have seen natural selection as virtually the sole source of that order. But Darwin could not have suspected the existence of self-orgardzation, a recently discovered, innate property of some complex systems. It is possible that biological order reflects in part a spontaneous order on which selection has acted. Selection has molded, but was not compelled to invent, the native coherence of ontogeny, or biological development. Indeed, the capacity to evolve and adapt may itself be an achievement of evolution. The studies supporting these conclusions remain tentative and incomplete. Nevertheless, on the basis of mathematical models for biological systems that exhibit self-orgardzation, one can make predictions that are consistent with the observed properties of organisms. We may have begun to understand evolution as the marriage of selection and self-orgardzation. [...]},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-1282897,adaptation,complexity,ecosystem-resilience,homeostasis,non-linearity,self-organization,tipping-point},
  number = {2}
}
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