Forest Eco-Physiological Models and Carbon Sequestration. Keenan, T.; Sabaté, S.; and Gracia, C. In Bravo, F.; Jandl, R.; LeMay, V.; and von Gadow, K., editors, Managing Forest Ecosystems: The Challenge of Climate Change, of Managing Forest Ecosystems, pages 83–102. Springer Netherlands.
Forest Eco-Physiological Models and Carbon Sequestration [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Modeling and monitoring the processes involved in terrestrial carbon sequestration are often thought to be independent events. In fact, rigorously validated modern modeling techniques are very useful tools in the monitoring of the carbon sequestration potential of an ecosystem through simulation, by highlighting key areas for study of what is a complex dynamical system. This is ever more important in the light of climate change, where it becomes essential to have an understanding of the future role of terrestrial ecosystems as potential sinks or sources in the global carbon cycle.The study of the effects of climate change on terrestrial ecosystems is one field of interest which requires the use of predictive tools such as functional simulation models. There are many possible applications of such models, from studying the responses of individual processes, the interactions of various processes, up to the responses of whole forest stands and ecosystems. This can be performed focusing on the response of forests to climate change (and in turn identifying feedbacks from forest ecosystem responses that may affect the rate of climate change), the effect of climate change on ecosystem service supplies which are necessary for societies well being (such as water supply, soil fertility and productivity), the effect of management on forest productivity, or in assessing the suitability of a certain site for plantation.
@incollection{keenanForestEcophysiologicalModels2008,
  title = {Forest Eco-Physiological Models and Carbon Sequestration},
  booktitle = {Managing {{Forest Ecosystems}}: {{The Challenge}} of {{Climate Change}}},
  author = {Keenan, T. and Sabaté, S. and Gracia, C.},
  editor = {Bravo, Felipe and Jandl, Robert and LeMay, Valerie and von Gadow, Klaus},
  date = {2008},
  pages = {83--102},
  publisher = {{Springer Netherlands}},
  location = {{Dordrecht}},
  doi = {10.1007/978-1-4020-8343-3_5},
  url = {https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-8343-3_5},
  urldate = {2019-03-01},
  abstract = {Modeling and monitoring the processes involved in terrestrial carbon sequestration are often thought to be independent events. In fact, rigorously validated modern modeling techniques are very useful tools in the monitoring of the carbon sequestration potential of an ecosystem through simulation, by highlighting key areas for study of what is a complex dynamical system. This is ever more important in the light of climate change, where it becomes essential to have an understanding of the future role of terrestrial ecosystems as potential sinks or sources in the global carbon cycle.The study of the effects of climate change on terrestrial ecosystems is one field of interest which requires the use of predictive tools such as functional simulation models. There are many possible applications of such models, from studying the responses of individual processes, the interactions of various processes, up to the responses of whole forest stands and ecosystems. This can be performed focusing on the response of forests to climate change (and in turn identifying feedbacks from forest ecosystem responses that may affect the rate of climate change), the effect of climate change on ecosystem service supplies which are necessary for societies well being (such as water supply, soil fertility and productivity), the effect of management on forest productivity, or in assessing the suitability of a certain site for plantation.},
  isbn = {978-1-4020-8343-3},
  keywords = {~INRMM-MiD:z-Q72SYN7N,carbon-sequestration,complexity,ecosystem-services,ensemble,europe,forest-resources,soil-carbon,uncertainty},
  langid = {english},
  options = {useprefix=true},
  series = {Managing {{Forest Ecosystems}}}
}
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