Increases in fluxes of greenhouse gases and methyl mercury following flooding of an experimental reservoir. Kelly, C., A., Vincent, L., S., L., Heyes, A., Moore, T., R., Schiff, S., L., Aravena, R., Scott, K., J., Dyck, B., S., Harris, R., Warner, B., C., Edwards, G., Rudd, J., W., M., Bodaly, R., A., & Roulet, N., P. Environmental Science and Technology, 31(5):1334-1344, 1997.
Increases in fluxes of greenhouse gases and methyl mercury following flooding of an experimental reservoir [pdf]Paper  Increases in fluxes of greenhouse gases and methyl mercury following flooding of an experimental reservoir [link]Website  abstract   bibtex   
Experimental flooding of a boreal forest wetland caused the wetland to change from being a small, natural carbon sink, with respect to the atmosphere, of -6.6 g of C m-2 yr-1 to a large source of +130 g of C m-2 yr-1. This change was caused by the death of the vegetation, which eliminated the photosynthetic CO2 sink and stimulated the microbial production of CO2 and CH4 from decomposition of plant tissues and peat. Two recommendations, which should minimize both greenhouse gas production and MeHg production in reservoirs, can be made: (1) minimize the total area of land flooded (i.e., avoid flooding areas of low relief) and (2) minimize the flooding of wetlands, which contain larger quantities of organic carbon than uplands and are sites of intense production of MeHg.
@article{
 title = {Increases in fluxes of greenhouse gases and methyl mercury following flooding of an experimental reservoir},
 type = {article},
 year = {1997},
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 pages = {1334-1344},
 volume = {31},
 websites = {http://pubs.acs.org/cgi-bin/abstract.cgi/esthag/1997/31/i05/abs/es9604931.html},
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 abstract = {Experimental flooding of a boreal forest wetland caused the wetland to change from being a small, natural carbon sink, with respect to the atmosphere, of -6.6 g of C m-2 yr-1 to a large source of +130 g of C m-2 yr-1. This change was caused by the death of the vegetation, which eliminated the photosynthetic CO2 sink and stimulated the microbial production of CO2 and CH4 from decomposition of plant tissues and peat. Two recommendations, which should minimize both greenhouse gas production and MeHg production in reservoirs, can be made: (1) minimize the total area of land flooded (i.e., avoid flooding areas of low relief) and (2) minimize the flooding of wetlands, which contain larger quantities of organic carbon than uplands and are sites of intense production of MeHg.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Kelly, C. A. and Vincent, L. S. L. and Heyes, A. and Moore, T. R. and Schiff, S. L. and Aravena, R. and Scott, K. J. and Dyck, B. S. and Harris, R. and Warner, B. C. and Edwards, G. and Rudd, J. W. M. and Bodaly, R. A. and Roulet, N. P.},
 journal = {Environmental Science and Technology},
 number = {5},
 keywords = {CARBON,CARBON BUDGET,CH4,CO2,CONTAMINANTS,DECOMPOSITION,ELA,ELARP,FISH,FORESTS,GLOBAL WARMING,GREENHOUSE GASES,HG,L632,L979,MASS BALANCE,MEHG,METHYLATION,PEAT,RESERVOIR,Reservoirs,WATER LEVEL,Wetlands,flooding,mercury}
}
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