Democratic Performance of Parties and Legitimacy in Europe. Keman, H. 37(2):309--330.
Democratic Performance of Parties and Legitimacy in Europe [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
This article analyses the development of legitimacy across 20 European democracies (1990–2010). The claim is that the democratic performance of parties affects levels of legitimacy. A conceptual and empirical discussion is presented to establish this relationship. Democratic performance is characterised by trusting parties to be responsive to the electorate and responsible in government. Legitimacy is defined as a composite measure representing satisfaction with parties, compliance with the rule of law as well as voter turnout and willingness to protest. The responsiveness of parties appears less representative on public concerns and governmental responsibility appears closer to party interests than to the general interest. Hence, a ‘democratic deficit’ seems to have emerged across Europe, manifested by more electoral volatility, new parties and alternation in government and lower survival rates of governments. This negatively affects trust in parties, parliament and government efficacy. Hence, party behaviour has not strongly contributed to political legitimacy since the 1990s.
@article{ keman_democratic_2014,
  title = {Democratic Performance of Parties and Legitimacy in Europe},
  volume = {37},
  issn = {0140-2382},
  url = {http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01402382.2014.887877},
  doi = {10.1080/01402382.2014.887877},
  abstract = {This article analyses the development of legitimacy across 20 European democracies (1990–2010). The claim is that the democratic performance of parties affects levels of legitimacy. A conceptual and empirical discussion is presented to establish this relationship. Democratic performance is characterised by trusting parties to be responsive to the electorate and responsible in government. Legitimacy is defined as a composite measure representing satisfaction with parties, compliance with the rule of law as well as voter turnout and willingness to protest. The responsiveness of parties appears less representative on public concerns and governmental responsibility appears closer to party interests than to the general interest. Hence, a ‘democratic deficit’ seems to have emerged across Europe, manifested by more electoral volatility, new parties and alternation in government and lower survival rates of governments. This negatively affects trust in parties, parliament and government efficacy. Hence, party behaviour has not strongly contributed to political legitimacy since the 1990s.},
  pages = {309--330},
  number = {2},
  journaltitle = {West European Politics},
  author = {Keman, Hans},
  urldate = {2014-04-08},
  date = {2014},
  file = {Keman 2014 - Democratic Performance of Parties and Legitimacy in Europe.pdf:/Users/nicolasmerz/Dropbox/Literatur/Archiv/Keman 2014 - Democratic Performance of Parties and Legitimacy in Europe.pdf:application/pdf}
}
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