Parental effects on offspring longevity--evidence from 17th to 19th century reproductive histories. Kemkes-Grottenthaler, A. Ann Hum Biol, 31(2):139-158, 2004.
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BACKGROUND: Family studies provide support for a modest genetic influence on offspring life span, although the magnitude of these correlations is small. AIM: The study aimed to clarify the relative contributions of parental age at birth and overall parental longevity on offspring lifespan, and to identify the biological and cultural mechanisms. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Information was derived from two village genealogies (1650-1927) encompassing 9979 births (5315 males, 4664 females). Data selection was guided by the inclusion of information about parental age at birth and lifespan, offspring lifespan and cohort-specific life expectancy. RESULTS: Parental age at reproduction displayed a negative association with offspring survivability, which was caused by a host of biological as well as environmental factors. In contrast, parental lifespan was positively associated with offspring age at death. These effects differed by parent's and child's sex. CONCLUSION: The maternal age effect on female progeny is thought to be indicative of a preferential genetic load. From an evolutionary point of view, direct selection for maternal lifespan may be an adaptive strategy to enhance child survival prospects.
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 title = {Parental effects on offspring longevity--evidence from 17th to 19th century reproductive histories},
 type = {article},
 year = {2004},
 identifiers = {[object Object]},
 keywords = {*Maternal Age,*Paternal Age,*Reproductive History,Cohort Studies,Female,Germany,History, 17th Century,History, 18th Century,History, 19th Century,History, 20th Century,Humans,Longevity/*genetics,Male},
 pages = {139-158},
 volume = {31},
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 abstract = {BACKGROUND: Family studies provide support for a modest genetic influence on offspring life span, although the magnitude of these correlations is small. AIM: The study aimed to clarify the relative contributions of parental age at birth and overall parental longevity on offspring lifespan, and to identify the biological and cultural mechanisms. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Information was derived from two village genealogies (1650-1927) encompassing 9979 births (5315 males, 4664 females). Data selection was guided by the inclusion of information about parental age at birth and lifespan, offspring lifespan and cohort-specific life expectancy. RESULTS: Parental age at reproduction displayed a negative association with offspring survivability, which was caused by a host of biological as well as environmental factors. In contrast, parental lifespan was positively associated with offspring age at death. These effects differed by parent's and child's sex. CONCLUSION: The maternal age effect on female progeny is thought to be indicative of a preferential genetic load. From an evolutionary point of view, direct selection for maternal lifespan may be an adaptive strategy to enhance child survival prospects.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Kemkes-Grottenthaler, A},
 journal = {Ann Hum Biol},
 number = {2}
}
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