Breeding and Cultivation of Black Locust, Robinia Pseudoacacia, in Hungary. Keresztesi, B. 6(3):217–244.
Breeding and Cultivation of Black Locust, Robinia Pseudoacacia, in Hungary [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Black or common locust was introduced into Hungary between 1710 and 1720. Its present extent is 276 000 ha, 18.2\,% of the total forest area. Since its introduction, black locust has always been closely associated with farming. Selection breeding followed numerous steps. The best shipmast-type groves in the best stands were surveyed for superior trees which were grafted for clone tests. The National Agricultural Council for Variety Testing approved three selected or introduced locust cultivars in 1973 and five more in 1979. The registered cultivars and a further 13 candidates are grouped into three categories according to their proposed uses: sawlogs; poles and posts; and finally beekeeping and decorative planting. Some cultivars such as 'Zalai', 'Kiskunsági', 'Császártöltési', 'Egylevelü' and 'Váti 46' are suitable both for forestry and beekeeping. Vegetative propagation systems have been introduced for mass propagation of the improved cultivars. The planned production of 8 million plants in 1984 covers two-thirds of the demand. The selected cultivars demand intensive technologies, of which planting after deep-ploughing on better sites is the best. Silvicultural models have been worked out for producing sawlogs on better sites and poles and posts on medium sites. Interest in black locust is growing both in Europe and Asia. The area of man-made locust stands has increased in the last 20 years from 337 000 to 1 890 000 ha. These figures exclude China, where the tree is extensively used. In recent years the energy and forage aspects have become more interesting. South Korea leads in this respect, but various projects are also being undertaken in Hungary.
@article{keresztesiBreedingCultivationBlack1983,
  title = {Breeding and Cultivation of Black Locust, {{Robinia}} Pseudoacacia, in {{Hungary}}},
  author = {Keresztesi, Béla},
  date = {1983-08},
  journaltitle = {Forest Ecology and Management},
  volume = {6},
  pages = {217--244},
  issn = {0378-1127},
  doi = {10.1016/s0378-1127(83)80004-8},
  url = {https://doi.org/10.1016/s0378-1127(83)80004-8},
  abstract = {Black or common locust was introduced into Hungary between 1710 and 1720. Its present extent is 276 000 ha, 18.2\,\% of the total forest area. Since its introduction, black locust has always been closely associated with farming. Selection breeding followed numerous steps. The best shipmast-type groves in the best stands were surveyed for superior trees which were grafted for clone tests. The National Agricultural Council for Variety Testing approved three selected or introduced locust cultivars in 1973 and five more in 1979. The registered cultivars and a further 13 candidates are grouped into three categories according to their proposed uses: sawlogs; poles and posts; and finally beekeeping and decorative planting. Some cultivars such as 'Zalai', 'Kiskunsági', 'Császártöltési', 'Egylevelü' and 'Váti 46' are suitable both for forestry and beekeeping. Vegetative propagation systems have been introduced for mass propagation of the improved cultivars. The planned production of 8 million plants in 1984 covers two-thirds of the demand. The selected cultivars demand intensive technologies, of which planting after deep-ploughing on better sites is the best. Silvicultural models have been worked out for producing sawlogs on better sites and poles and posts on medium sites. Interest in black locust is growing both in Europe and Asia. The area of man-made locust stands has increased in the last 20 years from 337 000 to 1 890 000 ha. These figures exclude China, where the tree is extensively used. In recent years the energy and forage aspects have become more interesting. South Korea leads in this respect, but various projects are also being undertaken in Hungary.},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-13798423,forest-resources,genetic-conservation,genetic-variability,hungary,robinia-pseudoacacia},
  number = {3}
}
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