Remote Sensing Based Post-Disaster Damage Mapping, Ready for a Collaborative Approach?. Kerle, N. 4(1):290822+.
Remote Sensing Based Post-Disaster Damage Mapping, Ready for a Collaborative Approach? [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
[Excerpt] Rapid and accurate assessment of structural damage is essential after disaster events, especially in densely built-up urban areas. The results provide guidance for rescue forces and other immediate relief efforts, as well as subsequent rehabilitation and reconstruction. Especially for spatially extensive events, ground-based mapping is too slow, typically hindered by disaster-related site access difficulties, or too dangerous as in the case of potential radioactive contamination resulting from the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami disaster in Japan. Remote sensing has long been seen as a potential solution. Essentially, any type of platform-sensor combination is capable of providing some form of useful view on a disaster scene. However, optimal remote sensing strategies that consider the actual information needs of specific stakeholders, the technical utility of a given platform and sensor with respect to the types of infrastructure and damage present, as well as temporal and environmental limitations, are harder to determine. The utility of airborne and spaceborne remote sensing in emergency response was reviewed by Kerle et al. [1] and Zhang and Kerle [2], respectively. Many studies have investigated the utility of imagery for damage mapping, covering the entire spectrum from low-cost and uncalibrated airborne data (still or video imagery), deployed on balloons, kites, unmanned aerial vehicles or piloted aircraft, to sophisticated multi- or hyperspectral, lidar, thermal or radar devices mounted on air- or spaceborne platforms. To respond rapidly to a disaster anywhere in the world, often only satellites offer a solution. To realize this potential, and to create a dependable disaster support instrument, the International Charter ” Space and Major Disasters” was set up by the European, French and Canadian space agencies [see 3], and has been activated nearly 300 times since November 2000. The Charter is only responsible for the initial satellite image acquisition, while the subsequent data processing and damage mapping is mainly done by the DLR Center for Crisis Information (DLR-ZKI), UNOSAT, or the Service Régional de Traitement d'Image et de Télédétection (SERTIT, based at Strasbourg University, France). While damage map generation based on Charter data has long been a routine activity, recent disaster events have highlighted (i) limitations in the process, (ii) newly emerging and potentially competitive methods, and (iii) a far wider field of stakeholders (both map producers and users) than ever before. At the same time we are seeing a democratization of geodata and -tool access, which, together with growing spatial literacy outside the professional geoinformatics domain, also offers the potential for more collaborative damage mapping. The suitability and potential challenges of such approaches are addressed in this article.
@article{kerleRemoteSensingBased2011,
  title = {Remote Sensing Based Post-Disaster Damage Mapping, Ready for a Collaborative Approach?},
  author = {Kerle, Norman},
  date = {2011},
  journaltitle = {IEEE Earthzine},
  volume = {4},
  pages = {290822+},
  url = {http://mfkp.org/INRMM/article/13384708},
  abstract = {[Excerpt] Rapid and accurate assessment of structural damage is essential after disaster events, especially in densely built-up urban areas. The results provide guidance for rescue forces and other immediate relief efforts, as well as subsequent rehabilitation and reconstruction. Especially for spatially extensive events, ground-based mapping is too slow, typically hindered by disaster-related site access difficulties, or too dangerous as in the case of potential radioactive contamination resulting from the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami disaster in Japan. Remote sensing has long been seen as a potential solution. Essentially, any type of platform-sensor combination is capable of providing some form of useful view on a disaster scene. However, optimal remote sensing strategies that consider the actual information needs of specific stakeholders, the technical utility of a given platform and sensor with respect to the types of infrastructure and damage present, as well as temporal and environmental limitations, are harder to determine. The utility of airborne and spaceborne remote sensing in emergency response was reviewed by Kerle et al. [1] and Zhang and Kerle [2], respectively.

Many studies have investigated the utility of imagery for damage mapping, covering the entire spectrum from low-cost and uncalibrated airborne data (still or video imagery), deployed on balloons, kites, unmanned aerial vehicles or piloted aircraft, to sophisticated multi- or hyperspectral, lidar, thermal or radar devices mounted on air- or spaceborne platforms. To respond rapidly to a disaster anywhere in the world, often only satellites offer a solution. To realize this potential, and to create a dependable disaster support instrument, the International Charter ” Space and Major Disasters” was set up by the European, French and Canadian space agencies [see 3], and has been activated nearly 300 times since November 2000. The Charter is only responsible for the initial satellite image acquisition, while the subsequent data processing and damage mapping is mainly done by the DLR Center for Crisis Information (DLR-ZKI), UNOSAT, or the Service Régional de Traitement d'Image et de Télédétection (SERTIT, based at Strasbourg University, France).

While damage map generation based on Charter data has long been a routine activity, recent disaster events have highlighted (i) limitations in the process, (ii) newly emerging and potentially competitive methods, and (iii) a far wider field of stakeholders (both map producers and users) than ever before. At the same time we are seeing a democratization of geodata and -tool access, which, together with growing spatial literacy outside the professional geoinformatics domain, also offers the potential for more collaborative damage mapping. The suitability and potential challenges of such approaches are addressed in this article.},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-13384708,assessment,disasters,earthquakes,geospatial,rapid-assessment,remote-sensing},
  number = {1}
}
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