Source apportionment of fine particles in Washington, DC, utilizing temperature-resolved carbon fractions. Kim, E. and Hopke, P., K. Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association (1995), 54(7):773-85, 7, 2004.
Source apportionment of fine particles in Washington, DC, utilizing temperature-resolved carbon fractions. [pdf]Paper  Source apportionment of fine particles in Washington, DC, utilizing temperature-resolved carbon fractions. [link]Website  abstract   bibtex   
Integrated ambient particulate matter < or =2.5 microm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) samples were collected at a centrally located urban monitoring site in Washington, DC, on Wednesdays and Saturdays using Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments samplers. Particulate carbon was analyzed using the thermal optical reflectance method that divides carbon into four organic carbon fractions, pyrolyzed organic carbon, and three elemental carbon fractions. A total of 35 variables measured in 718 samples collected between August 1988 and December 1997 were analyzed. The data were analyzed using Positive Matrix Factorization and 10 sources were identified: sulfate (SO4(2-))-rich secondary aerosol I (43%), gasoline vehicle (21%), SO4(2-)-rich secondary aerosol II (11%), nitrate-rich secondary aerosol (9%), SO4(2-)-rich secondary aerosol III (6%), incinerator (4%), aged sea salt (2%), airborne soil (2%), diesel emissions (2%), and oil combustion (2%). In contrast to a previous study that included only total organic carbon and elemental carbon fractions, motor vehicles were separated into fractions identified as gasoline vehicle and diesel emissions containing carbon fractions whose abundances were different between the two sources. This study indicates that the temperature-resolved carbon fraction data can be utilized to enhance source apportionment, especially with respect to the separation of diesel emissions from gasoline vehicle sources. Conditional probability functions using surface wind data and deduced source contributions aid in the identifications of local sources.
@article{
 title = {Source apportionment of fine particles in Washington, DC, utilizing temperature-resolved carbon fractions.},
 type = {article},
 year = {2004},
 identifiers = {[object Object]},
 keywords = {Air Pollutants,Air Pollutants: analysis,Carbon,Carbon: analysis,District of Columbia,Environmental Monitoring,Environmental Monitoring: methods,Epidemiologic Studies,Humans,Particle Size,Reference Values,Temperature},
 pages = {773-85},
 volume = {54},
 websites = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15303290},
 month = {7},
 id = {9b2bb637-054f-33d8-abf0-3bfb30a2c952},
 created = {2014-05-31T04:12:15.000Z},
 file_attached = {true},
 profile_id = {9edae5ec-3a23-3830-8934-2c27bef6ccbe},
 group_id = {63e349d6-2c70-3938-9e67-2f6483f6cbab},
 last_modified = {2014-11-19T06:01:41.000Z},
 read = {false},
 starred = {false},
 authored = {false},
 confirmed = {true},
 hidden = {false},
 abstract = {Integrated ambient particulate matter < or =2.5 microm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) samples were collected at a centrally located urban monitoring site in Washington, DC, on Wednesdays and Saturdays using Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments samplers. Particulate carbon was analyzed using the thermal optical reflectance method that divides carbon into four organic carbon fractions, pyrolyzed organic carbon, and three elemental carbon fractions. A total of 35 variables measured in 718 samples collected between August 1988 and December 1997 were analyzed. The data were analyzed using Positive Matrix Factorization and 10 sources were identified: sulfate (SO4(2-))-rich secondary aerosol I (43%), gasoline vehicle (21%), SO4(2-)-rich secondary aerosol II (11%), nitrate-rich secondary aerosol (9%), SO4(2-)-rich secondary aerosol III (6%), incinerator (4%), aged sea salt (2%), airborne soil (2%), diesel emissions (2%), and oil combustion (2%). In contrast to a previous study that included only total organic carbon and elemental carbon fractions, motor vehicles were separated into fractions identified as gasoline vehicle and diesel emissions containing carbon fractions whose abundances were different between the two sources. This study indicates that the temperature-resolved carbon fraction data can be utilized to enhance source apportionment, especially with respect to the separation of diesel emissions from gasoline vehicle sources. Conditional probability functions using surface wind data and deduced source contributions aid in the identifications of local sources.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Kim, Eugene and Hopke, Philip K},
 journal = {Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association (1995)},
 number = {7}
}
Downloads: 0