” How Come I'm Allowing Strangers To Go Through My. King, J. In Proceedings of the Workshop on Usable Privacy & Security for Mobile Devices (U-PriSM), 7.
abstract   bibtex   
This study examines the privacy expectations of smartphone users by exploring two specific dimensions to smartphone privacy: participants' concerns with other people accessing the personal information stored on their smartphones, and applications accessing this information via platform APIs. We interviewed 24 Apple iPhone and Google Android users about their smartphone usage, using Altman's theory of boundary regulation and Nissenbaum's theory of contextual integrity to guide our inquiry. Our contribution is a contextually-situated examination of smartphone users' privacy preferences and expectations based upon real world usage. Overall, we found that the default flows of smartphone APIs defy users' privacy expectations. In contradiction to the assumptions made by many mobile privacy studies, we found that our participants were far less concerned with sharing their location compared to other types of information available through the platforms' APIs. Further, we found that not only did some of our participants not understand the capabilities of applications, they also relied upon a number of assurance structures (sometimes inaccurately) to assuage their privacy concerns when selecting applications. We conclude with suggestions for platforms and application developers to make smartphone APIs and applications function in a manner that supports users' privacy expectations, as well as a call to use theoretically grounded methods for mobile privacy research.
@inProceedings{
 title = {” How Come I'm Allowing Strangers To Go Through My},
 type = {inProceedings},
 month = {7},
 id = {d1365a7c-d7a3-367c-8e50-2298e7ca0174},
 created = {2018-07-12T21:32:22.690Z},
 file_attached = {false},
 profile_id = {f954d000-ce94-3da6-bd26-b983145a920f},
 group_id = {b0b145a3-980e-3ad7-a16f-c93918c606ed},
 last_modified = {2018-07-12T21:32:22.690Z},
 read = {false},
 starred = {false},
 authored = {false},
 confirmed = {true},
 hidden = {false},
 citation_key = {king:expectations},
 source_type = {inproceedings},
 notes = {Pdf in the link is a draft. Please contact author for latest draft.},
 private_publication = {false},
 abstract = {This study examines the privacy expectations of 
smartphone users by exploring two specific dimensions to 
smartphone privacy: participants' concerns with other 
people accessing the personal information stored on their 
smartphones, and applications accessing this information 
via platform APIs. We interviewed 24 Apple iPhone and 
Google Android users about their smartphone usage, using 
Altman's theory of boundary regulation and Nissenbaum's 
theory of contextual integrity to guide our inquiry. Our 
contribution is a contextually-situated examination of 
smartphone users' privacy preferences and expectations 
based upon real world usage. Overall, we found that the 
default flows of smartphone APIs defy users' privacy 
expectations. In contradiction to the assumptions made by 
many mobile privacy studies, we found that our participants 
were far less concerned with sharing their location 
compared to other types of information available through 
the platforms' APIs. Further, we found that not only did 
some of our participants not understand the capabilities of 
applications, they also relied upon a number of assurance 
structures (sometimes inaccurately) to assuage their privacy 
concerns when selecting applications. We conclude with 
suggestions for platforms and application developers to 
make smartphone APIs and applications function in a 
manner that supports users' privacy expectations, as well as 
a call to use theoretically grounded methods for mobile 
privacy research.},
 bibtype = {inProceedings},
 author = {King, Jennifer},
 booktitle = {Proceedings of the Workshop on Usable Privacy & Security for Mobile Devices (U-PriSM)}
}
Downloads: 0