Estimation of Direct Landslide Costs in Industrialized Countries: Challenges, Concepts, and Case Study. Klose, M., Highland, L., Damm, B., & Terhorst, B. In Sassa, K., Canuti, P., & Yin, Y., editors, Landslide Science for a Safer Geoenvironment, pages 661–667. Springer International Publishing.
Estimation of Direct Landslide Costs in Industrialized Countries: Challenges, Concepts, and Case Study [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
This paper presents a short summary of the challenges and concepts in previous landslide loss studies and introduces a methodological framework for the estimation of direct landslide costs in industrialized countries. A case study of landslide losses for federal roads in the Lower Saxon Uplands (NW Germany) exemplifies the application of this methodology in a regional setting. [] Globally, the costs of landslide damage are proven to be of economic significance, but yet efforts for their systematic estimation are still rare. The evaluation of landslide costs requires the consideration of complex causalities and high spatiotemporal variability. Landslide impacts on economic systems vary as a function of their level of development, and specific methodologies are required for different geographic areas due to the difficulty of comparing widely dissimilar types of economies. [] In this approach, landslide costs are spatially extrapolated from sub-regional levels after their calculation in representative case study areas. In the first step, cost survey is closely linked with methods of cost modeling, which in turn take advantage of landslide database information. The cost extrapolation to large-scale levels is realized by a landslide susceptibility model combining cost figures with indices of infrastructure exposure. [Conclusions] The annual costs of global landslide damage probably account for billions of dollars, but yet there is still a lack of concepts and tools for their systematic estimation. This mainly relates to the complex nature of landslide occurrence and cost dependency to highly diverse cost factors. This paper presented a preliminary framework of well-established and newly developed methods that in combination may allow for effective ways to overcome this huge research deficit in future cost evaluations.
@incollection{kloseEstimationDirectLandslide2014,
  title = {Estimation of Direct Landslide Costs in Industrialized Countries: {{Challenges}}, Concepts, and Case Study},
  booktitle = {Landslide {{Science}} for a {{Safer Geoenvironment}}},
  author = {Klose, Martin and Highland, Lynn and Damm, Bodo and Terhorst, Birgit},
  editor = {Sassa, Kyoji and Canuti, Paolo and Yin, Yueping},
  date = {2014},
  pages = {661--667},
  publisher = {{Springer International Publishing}},
  doi = {10.1007/978-3-319-05050-8\\_103},
  url = {http://mfkp.org/INRMM/article/13797663},
  abstract = {This paper presents a short summary of the challenges and concepts in previous landslide loss studies and introduces a methodological framework for the estimation of direct landslide costs in industrialized countries. A case study of landslide losses for federal roads in the Lower Saxon Uplands (NW Germany) exemplifies the application of this methodology in a regional setting.

[] Globally, the costs of landslide damage are proven to be of economic significance, but yet efforts for their systematic estimation are still rare. The evaluation of landslide costs requires the consideration of complex causalities and high spatiotemporal variability. Landslide impacts on economic systems vary as a function of their level of development, and specific methodologies are required for different geographic areas due to the difficulty of comparing widely dissimilar types of economies.

[] In this approach, landslide costs are spatially extrapolated from sub-regional levels after their calculation in representative case study areas. In the first step, cost survey is closely linked with methods of cost modeling, which in turn take advantage of landslide database information. The cost extrapolation to large-scale levels is realized by a landslide susceptibility model combining cost figures with indices of infrastructure exposure.

[Conclusions] The annual costs of global landslide damage probably account for billions of dollars, but yet there is still a lack of concepts and tools for their systematic estimation. This mainly relates to the complex nature of landslide occurrence and cost dependency to highly diverse cost factors. This paper presented a preliminary framework of well-established and newly developed methods that in combination may allow for effective ways to overcome this huge research deficit in future cost evaluations.},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-13797663,~to-add-doi-URL,costs,ecosystem-services,landslides,nonmarket-impacts,soil-resources}
}
Downloads: 0