Beyond light: Physical, geological, and geochemical parameters as possible submersed aquatic vegetation habitat requirements. Koch, E. W. 2001. Publication Title: Estuaries
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When determining the suitability of a certain area as a habitat for submersed aquatic vegetation (SAV), light and parameters that modify light (epiphytes, total suspended solids, chlorophyll concentration, nutrients) are the first factors to be taken into consideration. As a result, in the past 10 years, light has been the major focus of SAV research. Even so, we are still unable to explain why SAV often occurs in one area but is absent just a few meters away. Recent studies have shown that SAV may not occur in areas where light levels are adequate but other parameters like wave energy and sulfide concentrations are excessive. It is time to look beyond light when determining SAV habitat requirements. This paper summarizes the impact that physical (waves, currents, tides, and turbulence), geological (sediment grain size and organic matter), and geochemical (mainly sulfide) parameters may have on SAV habitat suitability. Light remains an integral part of the discussion but the focus shifts from maximum depths of distribution (determined mainly by light) to the range SAV can colonize between the maximum and minimum depths of distribution (determined mainly by physical forces). This paper establishes minimum depths of occurrence resulting from the effects of tides and waves, preferred ranges in particle size, organic content, and sulfide, as well as limits on currents and waves as related to the capacity to stay rooted at one extreme and diffusive boundary layer constrains at the other.
@book{koch_beyond_2001,
	title = {Beyond light: {Physical}, geological, and geochemical parameters as possible submersed aquatic vegetation habitat requirements},
	abstract = {When determining the suitability of a certain area as a habitat for submersed aquatic vegetation (SAV), light and parameters that modify light (epiphytes, total suspended solids, chlorophyll concentration, nutrients) are the first factors to be taken into consideration. As a result, in the past 10 years, light has been the major focus of SAV research. Even so, we are still unable to explain why SAV often occurs in one area but is absent just a few meters away. Recent studies have shown that SAV may not occur in areas where light levels are adequate but other parameters like wave energy and sulfide concentrations are excessive. It is time to look beyond light when determining SAV habitat requirements. This paper summarizes the impact that physical (waves, currents, tides, and turbulence), geological (sediment grain size and organic matter), and geochemical (mainly sulfide) parameters may have on SAV habitat suitability. Light remains an integral part of the discussion but the focus shifts from maximum depths of distribution (determined mainly by light) to the range SAV can colonize between the maximum and minimum depths of distribution (determined mainly by physical forces). This paper establishes minimum depths of occurrence resulting from the effects of tides and waves, preferred ranges in particle size, organic content, and sulfide, as well as limits on currents and waves as related to the capacity to stay rooted at one extreme and diffusive boundary layer constrains at the other.},
	author = {Koch, E. W.},
	year = {2001},
	doi = {10.2307/1352808},
	note = {Publication Title: Estuaries},
	keywords = {Environmental Interactions, Processes, and Modeling}
}

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